2017

03.03

UgandAbout

Ugandabout – febbraio 2017

di

Alcune notizie sull’Uganda e sull’Africa recuperate da internet nel febbraio 2017.

UGANDA, UNITED NATIONS TO HOST SOLIDARITY CONFERENCE ON REFUGEES 
1 february 2017

UGANDA WINS CONTINENTAL AWARD FOR MALARIA
2 february 2017

UGANDA BIRD FLU STRAIN MAY SPREAD IN LAKE VICTORIA REGION
2 february 2017

SUD SUDAN – L’UGANDA: «NON IMPORREMO GOVERNO AMICO A JUBA»
3 february 2017

SOMALIA – L’UGANDA CHIEDE PIU’ FONDI PER LE TRUPPE DI AMISON
8 february 2017

L’EMERGENZA. AFRICA, «SENZA AIUTI 24 MILIONI DI PERSONE CONDANNATE A MORTE»
11 february 2017

 US TU GIVE UGANDA $25M IN AID FOR REFUGEES
14 february 2017

UGANDA RUNNING OUT OF LAND FOR REFUGEES
14 february 2017

PROFESSIONAL FIGHTER RAISES MONEY TO TEACH SELF-DEFENSE IN UGANDA
14 february 2017

AFRICA/SUDSUDAN: “I MILITARI HANNO ASSALITO UN VILLAGGIO STUPRANDO DONNE E BAMBINE” ACCUSA UN VESCOVO ANGLICANO
15 february 2017

GANA, SENEGAL E UGANDA SU GOOGLE STREET VIEW 
15 february 2017

UGANDA, L’AMBASCIATRICE AKELLO: “VORREI MOLTI PIU’ INVESTITORI ITALIANI
15 february 2017

KENYA, RWANDA AND UGANDA LAUNCH TOURISM PORTAL
19 february 2017

UGANDA: WHY ARE UGANDANS SO ANGRY?
20 february 2017

ON THE ROAD WITH BODA-BODA, THE UBER OF UGANDA
24 february 2017

UGANDA MIGHT SOON BE A ‘STRANGE’ LAND AND AFRICA A ‘NEW’ CONTINENT
24 february 2017

UGANDA: 12 MILLION FACE FOOD INSECURITY
28 february 2017


UGANDA, UNITED NATIONS TO HOST SOLIDARITY CONFERENCE ON REFUGEES
1 february 2017
President Yoweri Museveni and the new United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres have engaged in a series of discussions ranging from the security situation in Somalia to South Sudan to Burundi and the Democratic Republic of Congo and pledged to strengthen efforts to develop sustainable peace and development in the region.
The two leaders who were meeting at the sidelines of the 28th Ordinary Summit of the AU in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia agreed on the need for the building of a national political ideology and national army in Somalia, and a need for the leaders in South Sudan to embrace democracy and fight sectarianism for the sake of peace in the newest nation and the importance of dialogue for all stakeholders in Burundi.
The UN Secretary General Antonia Guterres hailed President Yoweri Museveni’s influence and role in ensuring peace and security in the region and for his efforts as mediator in the Burundi conflict to ensure dialogue by all stakeholders.
He pledged to push for reforms at the United Nations as more countries rally to see a more reformed world body.
Uganda used its presidency of the UN General Assembly at the 69th session to push the African agenda on the reform of the United Nations.
President Museveni said then, that Africa and individual African countries can form credible partnerships beyond the continent’s shores and that reforms as will be agreed by all, will strengthen the United Nations not otherwise.
During the meeting, President Museveni urged the United Nations to help Uganda deal or handle the refugee situation, which is posing growing challenges each day. Uganda is the second largest refugee hosting country after Turkey in the world.
The two leaders agreed to host a solidarity conference on refugees in March with both Uganda and the United Nations as conveners.
President Museveni also urged the United Nations to support Uganda’s efforts on environment reclamation if its to meet SDG 15 of the United Nations development goals to protect, restore and promote sustainable use of the terrestrial ecosystems, sustainable manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss.
fonte: http://www.mediacentre.go.ug

Torna a inizio pagina

UGANDA WINS CONTINENTAL AWARD FOR MALARIA
2 february 2017

The positive trend is due to the country’s switch to more effective treatment with artemisinin-based combination therapy.
Uganda is one of the eight countries on the continent awarded at the ongoing 28th African Union Summit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia for outstanding commitment and innovation in the fight against disease.
According to a press statement released yesterday, the African Leaders Malaria Alliance (ALMA) award for Excellence recognizes Uganda alongside Botswana, Cabo Verde, Comoros, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia and Swaziland for their impact on malaria incidence and mortality. “Thanks to strong African leadership and innovative new partnerships, we are making unprecedented progress in the fight against malaria,” said Idriss Déby Itno, the President of Chad and current Chairperson of the African Union. Adding that the success of these countries shows the powerful impact that dedication and sufficient funding can have.
The recognized countries are said to have all achieved a reduction in malaria incidence of 40% or more from 2010-2015.
“The significant reduction in malaria in the three high-burden countries (DRC, Ethiopia and Uganda) demonstrates what can be achieved with political commitment, adequate financing and implementation of technically sound and evidence-based vector control and case management interventions, even where malaria transmission is high,” reads the statement.
Uganda according to Dr Jimmy Opigo, the program manager of the National Malaria Control Programme, despite the occasional outbreaks has registered significant progress in the fight against malaria.
The positive trend is according to Opigo due to the country’s switch to more effective treatment with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and consistent campaign and distribution of insecticide treated mosquito nets. Uganda has for the past three years distributed over 21 million mosquito nets.
The President is expected to launch a new distribution campaign on the 18thof February in Apac district. A total of 24 million nets are expected to be given out in a period of six months.
“The lifespan of mosquito nets is three years. So we need to redistribute to be able to sustain the gains achieved so far,” he said. The President according to Opigo has consistently spearheaded efforts towards elimination of malaria and most recently he commissioned a research on larviciding (spraying that targets mosquitoes at the larva stage).
Uganda is currently at the control stage of malaria with a target for pre-elimination by 2020 and elimination by 2030(as per Sustainable Development Goals target). We are turning the tide on malaria in Africa .The success is reflected in the countries ALMA honoured today. Our work is not done. We must remain focused to achieve our goal of a malaria-free Africa.” said Joy Phumaphi, the Executive Secretary of ALMA.
Since 2000 according to the statement, malaria mortality rates across the continent have fallen by 62% in all age groups and by 69% among children under five. The increase in those sleeping under long-lasting insecticidal nets, or protected by indoor residual spraying, as well as diagnostic testing of children and treatment of pregnant women has contributed to significantly lowering incidence and mortality in Africa.
“These achievements come at a time when African countries are providing more domestic funding to fight malaria.” reads the statement.
The ALMA Awards for Excellence celebrate exemplary leadership in malaria control and elimination efforts.  The awards are chosen by an independent selection committee comprised of leaders and experts in the areas of health, academia and the private sector.
fonte: www.newvision.co.ug

Torna a inizio pagina

 UGANDA BIRD FLU STRAIN MAY SPREAD IN LAKE VICTORIA REGION
2 february 2017

An outbreak of avian influenza in Uganda that’s killed migratory birds on the shores of Africa’s biggest lake may spread to other countries in the region.
The virus that has killed at least 1,200 wild birds on the shores of Lake Victoria has been confirmed to be H5N8, Nicholas Kauta, a council member at the World Organization for Animal Health, said Wednesday in e-mailed comments.
“The migratory birds affected tend to occupy beaches, hence the fear that the entire Lake Victoria ‘coastline’ and neighboring water bodies are risky spots,” said Kauta, who recently retired as director of animal resources of the Ugandan agriculture ministry. No human infections of the H5N8 strain have been detected so far, according to the World Health Organization.
The disease is thought to have spread in Asia and Europe via wild migratory birds, the WHO said. Uganda is the third African country to report an H5N8 outbreak, after Tunisia and Nigeria, according to the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota. The white-winged tern, the bird species infected in Uganda, has a large range and migrates from Europe during the winter. The country shares Lake Victoria with Kenya and Tanzania. The disease also infected a limited number of domestic fowls, the Ugandan government said in a Jan. 23 statement.
Uganda’s avian flu outbreak, along with an armyworm invasion on the continent, will be discussed at a meeting of the Food & Agriculture Organization on Feb. 14 in Harare, Zimbabwe’s capital, it said in an e-mailed statement. The virus stands to spread south due to migration patterns, it said. Countries south of Uganda include Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe.
fonte https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-02-01/uganda-bird-flu-strain-may-spread-in-lake-victoria-region

Torna a inizio pagina

SUD SUDAN – L’UGANDA: «NON IMPORREMO GOVERNO AMICO A JUBA»
3 february 2017
Imporre un Governo esterno «di fiducia» per cercare di porre fine alla guerra civile e al potenziale genocidio in Sud Sudan peggiorerebbe solo la situazione. L’Uganda quindi, secondo quanto dichiarato da esponenti di spicco dell’esecutivo di Kampala, non influirà in alcun modo sulla situazione politica del Paese confinante.
Kampala rispetterà il Governo del presidente Salva Kiir e sopporterà il peso crescente dei rifugiati in fuga dal Sud Sudan e, a differenza di quanto è emerso da indiscrezioni giornalistiche, non interverrà nella situazione interna del Paese confinante.
Okello Oryem, ministro degli Esteri ugandese, ha dichiarato che a una eventuale interferenza si opporrebbero con tutte le loro forze sia il Presidente Kiir, sia il suo oppositore Riek Machar, attualmente agli arresti domiciliari in Sud Africa.
fonte www.africarivista.it/

Torna a inizio pagina

SOMALIA – L’UGANDA CHIEDE PIU’ FONDI PER LE TRUPPE DI AMISON
8 february 2017
Il ministro degli Affari esteri ugandese, Sam Kutesa, ha dichiarato che il suo Governo sta spingendo per una revisione del finanziamento per la missione dell’Unione africana in Somalia (Amisom).
Kutesa, rivolgendosi ai giornalisti presso il Centro media, ha affermato: «Ciò che vogliamo è un aumento dei contributi ai Paesi che forniscono le loro truppe alla missione».
Il Governo ugandese ha schierato truppe in Somalia nel 2007, e attualmente gestisce una forza di pace di 6.000 uomini, una delle più grandi in Somalia. La missione è finanziata dall’Unione Europea (Ue) e dalle Nazioni Unite. Tuttavia, l’Unione europea ha recentemente annunciato l’intenzione di rivedere al ribasso il sostegno finanziario all’Amisom chiedendo che la comunità internazionale contribuisca maggiormente.
fonte www.africarivista.it/

Torna a inizio pagina

L’EMERGENZA. AFRICA, «SENZA AIUTI 24 MILIONI DI PERSONE CONDANNATE A MORTE»
11 february 2017
L’organismo di sviluppo regionale (Igad) lancia l’appello: in molti Paesi orientali e del Corno mancano acqua e cibo Gli effetti del clima hanno «peggiorato» la situazione «La nostra regione è nel mezzo di una gravissima siccità». È con queste parole che inizia il comunicato dell’Autorità inter-governativa per lo sviluppo (Igad), la comunità che include Paesi dell’Africa orientale e del Corno d’Africa. Una regione dove milioni dei suoi abitanti stanno soffrendo la fame e la sete. «Circa 24 milioni di civili potrebbero morire se non arriveranno gli aiuti entro le prossime settimane – continua l’appello dell’Igadi nostri dati stimano che almeno 11,2 milioni di queste persone versano ormai in gravissime condizioni». Le cause sono diverse. Innanzitutto, il cambiamento climatico. Fenomeni come La Niña e El Niño, legati ai cicli di variazione delle temperature dell’Oceano Indiano, hanno provocato l’anno scorso una forte scarsità di piogge: una mazzata per le coltivazioni e di cui si affrontano ora, anche dopo la fine dei fenomeni, le conseguenze.
«Le reazioni delle autorità di governo avvengono spesso in ritardo: i finanziamenti sono pochi e c’è scarsa volontà di adottare le misure appropriate», affermano invece all’unisono gli operatori di diverse agenzie umanitarie. Tale ritardo nell’intervenire provoca inoltre un aumento dei prezzi del cibo. Secondo l’Organizzazione Onu per l’alimentazione e dell’agricoltura (Fao), in Africa orientale ci sono attualmente «circa 17 milioni di persone» profondamente affetti dall’insicurezza alimentare. «Quasi tutto il territorio della Somalia non ha cibo e acqua sufficienti alla sua popolazione – conferma un recente rapporto Fao –. Ma la situazione è allarmante anche per gran parte del nord e del sud del Kenya, per il nord dell’Uganda, per zone estese dell’Etiopia e per diverse regioni del Sud Sudan».
Ma solo l’altro ieri il presidente keniano, Uhuru Kenyatta, ha dichiarato lo stato di siccità «un’emergenza nazionale», accogliendo le forti denunce arrivate anche dai vescovi della Conferenza episcopale del Kenya (Kccb): «Solo così potremo richiedere gli aiuti della comunità internazionale», aveva spiegato monsignor Philip Anyolo, presidente della Kccb. Anche in Sud Sudan, teatro di un conflitto civile dal 2013, la situazione è da tempo al limite: la gente muore mentre cerca di raggiungere zone più fertili al di là dei confini del Paese: «Due donne sono morte mentre tentavano di arrivare in Uganda – ha confermato ieri Louis Lobong, funzionario governativo nella regione meridionale di Kapoeta –. Migliaia di persone stanno andando verso la frontiera ugandese per scappare dall’insicurezza alimentare». Inoltre, a causa delle violenze, gli accessi degli operatori e dei convogli di aiuti sono ridotti al minimo e di conseguenza resta difficile ottenere cifre precise sulle vittime della siccità. Nella vicina Etiopia, invece, sebbene il governo sia stato in grado di dimezzare i civili a rischio rispetto all’anno scorso, i numeri forniti dalle autorità restano comunque molto alti: «Abbiamo circa 47 milioni di dollari per portare soccorso a 5,6 milioni di persone», analizza la Commissione etiope per la gestione del rischio e del disastro. Mozambico, Zimbabwe e Sudafrica sono anch’essi duramente colpiti: «Non abbiamo mai visto una cosa simile – racconta ai media sudafricani il coltivatore Chris Harvey – milioni di persone lottano per sopravvivere. Potremmo non avere nulla da coltivare l’anno prossimo». Sul versante occidentale del continente, invece, l’Onu ha avvertito che il nord della Nigeria sta per avvicinarsi livelli di carestia «inimmaginabili» anche a causa dei jihadisti di Boko Haram: «Circa 120mila nigeriani sono in condizioni catastrofiche – sottolineano diverse agenzie delle Nazioni Unite –. Oltre 500mila persone rischiano di morire a causa dell’attuale declino della sicurezza alimentare nel nord-est del Paese». E la «situazione si aggraverà tra giugno e agosto».
fonte www.avvenire.it

Torna a inizio pagina

 

US TU GIVE UGANDA $25M IN AID FOR REFUGEES
14 february 2017
The United States will give over $25m in humanitarian aid to Uganda, to help the nation cope with a huge influx of refugees fleeing conflict in east Africa, the US ambassador in Kampala said on Tuesday.
Uganda is hosting more than a million refugees, nearly 700 000 of whom escaped the brutal civil war raging in neighbouring South Sudan since December 2013.
US ambassador Deborah Malac praised Uganda’s “very progressive policy” towards refugees.
“We applaud that the government is committed to keeping the door open to refugees,” she told reporters. The $25.2m will be used to improve water and sanitation in refugee camps, fight gender-based violence and ensure ongoing protection.
Malac called for other countries to “step up and provide support” for the UN refugee agency and refugee-hosting countries. Saying that there appeared to be “no end in sight” to the violence in South Sudan, Malac urged “more of a response from the international community, not just from the usual actors.”
The UN says more than 52 000 South Sudanese refugees have arrived  in Uganda since the start of the year and the numbers are currently growing by over 4 000 per day.
The Ugandan minister for refugees, Hilary Onek, said the the scale of arrivals is stretching the capacity of one of the world’s poorest countries.
“We are worried about the load we are bearing,” Onek said. “It’s getting a little heavy for us to manage.” Uganda has been praised for offering one of the most favourable refugee protection environments in the world – providing for freedom of movement, the right to work and land for refugee camps. However, there have been isolated incidents of local politicians rallying people against refugees.
In the past week police and residents near Nakivale refugee camp in the southwest of Uganda clashed in a dispute over land allocation to refugees.
fonte www.news24.com

Torna a inizio pagina

UGANDA RUNNING OUT OF LAND FOR REFUGEES
14 february 2017
Government minister says the over 1M refugees in Uganda are leading to a land crunch and appeals for help. The Ugandan government is running out of land for the over one million refugees seeking shelter on its soil.
“The government land designated for refugees is limited and most of those areas are now occupied,” Hillary Onek, Uganda’s minister for relief, disaster preparedness and refugees, told journalists at a news conference Tuesday.
Uganda now hosts over one million refugees, mainly from volatile neighboring countries, especially South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo, according to figures from the UNHCR refugee agency. This makes it the third-largest refugee-hosting country in Africa and eighth in the world.
Onek stated that while they previously gave refugee families 1-3 acres of land to occupy, due to the swelling numbers, they had to start giving less. “Today it’s been reduced to half an acre. We have no option except giving them what we can afford, and we are struggling,” she explained.
Making an appeal, he added, “That’s why we are calling for support from other agencies and other countries that can also help and take these refugees, to take some.”
These land shortages can lead to conflict. At Nakivaale, a refugee camp that hosts over 124,800 refugees in Western Uganda’s Isingiro district, a local council officer last week put out radio announcements calling on locals to attack and overrun the refugee camp in order to grab land.
At the same news conference, Ajit Fernando, deputy representative of the UNHCR, called on donor countries to step up support to refugees. “It costs almost $10 million to host 10,000 refugees, and we have 4,000 crossing into Uganda every day. The underfunding is critical.”
U.S. Ambassador to Uganda Deborah Malac said Tuesday that Washington is giving Uganda and the UNHCR $25.2 million to support refugees in the country. The funds will be used to support programs targeting gender-based violence, livelihoods, water and sanitation, improved protection, and healthcare services.
fonte www.worldbulletin.net

Torna a inizio pagina

PROFESSIONAL FIGHTER RAISES MONEY TO TEACH SELF-DEFENSE IN UGANDA
14 february 2017
The popularity of the Ultimate Fighting Championships has put mixed-martial arts back in the national spotlight. Professional MMA fighter, D’Juan Owens is using that spotlight to educate and empower men and women in a place where it is truly needed.
Owens raises money to travel to Uganda to teach self-defense. “Initially, the trip just started as something I was doing for myself. I met a fellow humanitarian online, our ideologies aligned as far as what we wanted to do for the community so I wound up going to Uganda.”
Why Uganda?“In reading a lot of things about gender-based violence and how prevalent it was…wherever you have poverty..the higher the poverty..the higher the crime rate is..so I really wanted to focus on not only the mixed martial arts and jiu-jitsu aspect, but the self-defense aspect.”
“I didn’t realize just how powerful it was until I saw some of the reactions from the students – especially the women- when they saw that the technique worked. That ‘hey this can work against a resistant opponent’.”
What’s Next? “I’m going to Dakar, Senegal in West Africa. I’ll be doing a little more mixed martial arts and kickboxing instruction and also be connecting with some initiatives based around self-defense and gender- based violence prevention”.
How You Can Get Involved – On Sunday February 26th, Elevate MMA located at 2945 S. Miami Boulevard in Durham is hosting a public fundraising event to help D’Juan continue his journey. The event includes food trucks, chess, music, martial arts and an in-depth look at the Fight for Uganda initiative.
Want to Learn Martial Arts/ Self Defense?Not everyone who trains in the martial arts is a fighter. Women and men of all ages and from all walks of life (and kids, too!) can learn martial arts. Learning a martial art has benefits beyond self-defense- it builds confidence, discipline and a sense of community not to mention it’s a bully repellant for kids. Below is just a few locations to train in the Triangle, but a quick google search and reading a few reviews will help you find an academy or gym anywhere.
fonte www.twcnews.com

Torna a inizio pagina

AFRICA/SUDSUDAN: “I MILITARI HANNO ASSALITO UN VILLAGGIO STUPRANDO DONNE E BAMBINE” ACCUSA UN VESCOVO ANGLICANO
15 february 2017
Un Vescovo anglicano ha accusato l’esercito del Sud Sudan (SPLA) di stupri di massa e di violenze contro i civili nello Stato dell’Eastern Equatoria. “Non conosciamo il numero esatto delle donne che sono state stuprare ma abbiamo cinque donne e ragazze che sono ricoverate al Juba Teaching Hospital” ha dichiarato Paul Yugusuk, della diocesi anglicana di Lomega.
Secondo le testimonianze raccolte sul posto gli autori delle violenze sarebbero i militari del posto di guardia di Nesitu, all’estrema periferia sud della capitale Juba, che sono incaricati di proteggere la circolazione lungo la strada che porta da Juba a Nimule, al confine con l’Uganda.
L’assalto è stato condotto contro il villaggio di Kubi, sull’asse Juba-Nimule. Oltre ad avere violentato donne e ragazze, alcune molto giovani, i militari hanno arrestato e torturato 46 uomini, “dei quali 42 sono stati poi liberati ma quattro risultano scomparsi” dice il Vescovo. Il villaggio è stato completamente saccheggiato e la popolazione si è data alla fuga.
L’ONU e le chiese cristiane in Sud Sudan stanno moltiplicando gli allarmi per le crescenti violenze a sfondo etnico e tribale che caratterizzano la guerra civile tra il governo del Presidente Salva Kiir e le forze fedeli all’ex Vice Presidente Riek Machar. Un alto ufficiale dell’SPLA si è di recente dimesso accusando Kiir di pulizia etnica nei confronti di coloro che non appartengono alla sua etnia, i Dinka.
fonte www.fides.org

Torna a inizio pagina

GANA, SENEGAL E UGANDA SU GOOGLE STREET VIEW
15 february 2017
Il gruppo californiano ha fotografato a 360 gradi strade, monumenti e paesaggi di tre paesi africani: Ghana, Senegal e Uganda arrivano su Street View.
Dalle montagne del sud alle spiagge incontaminate dell’area occidentale, fino ai parchi di quella orientale, l’Africa è un continente tutto da scoprire, tra le zone più ricche e suggestive del pianeta per quanto riguarda biodiversità e varietà del paesaggio. Oggi è possibile osservarlo da vicino, in prima persona e senza muoversi da casa, grazie alla piattaforma Street View.
Il team di Google ha fotografato a 360 gradi le strade, i monumenti, le aree verdi e i punti di interesse di Ghana, Senegal e Uganda, rendendoli liberamente accessibili da chiunque, tramite browser desktop o applicazione mobile. Il numero complessivo dei paesi coperti dal servizio, a livello globale, sale dunque a 81 (7 nel continente africano, insieme a Sudafrica, Botswana, Kenya e altri). Tra le location immortalate c’è anche il villaggio ghanese di Nzulezo, ritenuto dall’UNESCO uno dei patrimoni dell’umanità, che sorge sulle acque del lago Tadane. Di seguito un’immagine di anteprima, mentre per immergersi nel pieno dell’esperienza basta un click su Street View.
Gli obiettivi di bigG sono entrati anche al National Theatre of Ghana che ospita la compagnia National Dance Company, la National Symphony Orchestra e il gruppo National Theatre Players, nonché nella piazza che ospita il monumento al Rinascimento Africano, un bronzo alto ben 49 metri situato nei pressi di Dakar, in Senegal. Gli amanti della natura possono invece intraprendere un viaggio virtuale tra le lande del Queen Elizabeth National Park, in Uganda, dove vivono dieci specie di primati (inclusi i scimpanzé) e oltre 600 di uccelli. Una terra dove il verde si estende oltre lo sguardo, dove l’azione dell’uomo non ha ancora intaccato l’equilibrio di un ecosistema sano e pulsante.
fonte www.webnews.it

Torna a inizio pagina

UGANDA, L’AMBASCIATRICE AKELLO: “VORREI MOLTI PIU’ INVESTITORI ITALIANI
15 february 2017
“Vorrei vedere molti più investitori italiani in Uganda”. Lo ha spiegato all’agenzia DIRE Grace Akello, Ambasciatrice dell’Uganda in Italia.
“E’ da tanto che cerchiamo di costruire una diplomazia economica con l’Italia. Abbiamo avuto vari investitori- ricorda- Sono stati degli italiani a occuparsi della seconda più grande diga del Paese del post-indipendenza, e ora ne stanno costruendo una a Bujagali e un’altra da 98 Megawatt ad Agago, nel nord del paese”.
Ma per la rappresentante di Kampala potrebbe essere fatto di più. Anche in virtù del fatto che tra questi due paese “esistono relazioni di lunghissima data”, soprattutto sul piano culturale. “Gli italiani sono molto coinvolti nel sistema educativo ugandese” spiega l’Ambasciatrice Akello, “soprattutto grazie ai missionari, arrivati dall’Italia a partire dai primi del Novecento, i quali si sono subito preoccupati di avviare scuole per garantire un’istruzione a tutti”.
La presenza italiana è stata inoltre significativa sul piano della salute pubblica, “attraverso la costruzione di ospedali e corsi di formazione per infermieri e ostetriche”, ricorda ancora la rappresentante diplomatica. In quanto all’Italia, “adoro vivere qui”, assicura. “La gente è accogliente e amichevole, mi ricorda molto gli ugandesi. Mi piace lo stile di vita, il cibo semplice, il fatto che la gente si cucini da sé, ed è tutto molto buono. Non ci sono tanti fast food. Inoltre mi piace il fatto che ci siano molti cattolici, che portano avanti i valori della Chiesa”. Nel Paese africano i cattolici costituiscono infatti circa la metà della popolazione. “Tutto questo – evidenzia la rappresentante di Kampala – fa dell’Italia un posto salutare in cui vivere. Sono stata in altre città, come Genova, Milano, Torino, Perugia. Sono tutte belle, ma Roma resta la mia preferita”, conclude.
L’ECONOMIA? “IN UGANDA CRESCE BENE”In Uganda economia e sicurezza negli ultimi anni si sono rafforzate, e questo è uno dei fattori che hanno favorito la vittoria alle presidenziali di Yoweri Museveni, capo di Stato da oltre trent’anni. Per questo Akello trova “logico” che i cittadini lo abbiano riconfermato in carica.
L’Ambasciatrice chiarisce che “l’opposizione non è debole. Alle ultime elezioni abbiamo ad esempio avuto tra i candidati Kizza Besygie del Forum of democratic change, l’ex Primo ministro, e molti altri provenienti da vari partiti di opposizione”, che hanno dato al presidente uscente filo da torcere, ma non sono riusciti a batterlo perché “Museveni è un leader forte”.
“La ricchezza in Uganda sta crescendo – assicura l’Ambasciatrice – è una delle economie più forti dell’Africa e la popolazione se ne sta accorgendo. Anche il livello della sicurezza è molto migliorato, il paese è più pacifico”. In che modo il governo combatte il terrorismo e l’islam radicale? “In Uganda- risponde la rappresentante diplomatica– procediamo con molta attenzione. A luglio del 2010 – quando abbiamo subito un doppio attacco bomba – abbiamo scoperto che nel paese esistevano delle cellule legate al terrorismo islamico di Al-Qaeda. Ai terroristi non era piaciuto che truppe ugandesi facessero parte del contingente di pace dell’Unione africana – l’Amisom, ndr – presente in Somalia. Per questa ragione, molte persone sono morte, persone che stavano semplicemente assistendo a una partita di rugby. Le bombe infatti esplosero all’interno dello stadio. Altre esplosero in un ristorante, dove della gente stava cenando. Da allora abbiamo ristrutturato la sicurezza interna, e procediamo con estrema attenzione, a partire dall’identificazione di tutte le persone che risiedono entro i confini nazionali”.
Un’altra grave minaccia per gli ugandesi è oggi rappresentata da cancro, “una nuova emergenza”, come lo definisce Grace Akello, “ma non un nuovo problema. La gente forse lo percepisce di più perché grazie ai media è meglio informata. Ma gli ammalati sono tanti”. In risposta a questa complessa malattia “abbiamo da molto tempo fondato un centro specializzato per la lotta ai tumori – l’Uganda cancer Institute – Il problema è come sempre trovare i fondi per finanziarlo e fornire così le cure necessarie. Inoltre abbiamo bisogno che il sistema sanitario nazionale faccia maggiore informazione– aggiunge ancora l’Ambasciatrice- affinché i malati non si rivolgano ai medici quando è ormai troppo tardi. Le persone devono sapere che cos’è il cancro, cosa provoca e quali conseguenze comporta. In molti sono ancora convinti che è sufficiente essere toccati da un malato per restarne contagiati. Esiste una vera propria fobia”. Di fronte a una situazione così complessa, l’Ambasciatrice suggerisce di mettere rapidamente in campo “una strategia per il trattamento dei malati oncologici prima che sia troppo tardi”, partendo “dall’educazione” e dalla creazione “di consapevolezza” circa questo insidioso problema.
fonte www.dire.it

Torna a inizio pagina

KENYA, RWANDA AND UGANDA LAUNCH TOURISM PORTAL
19 february 2017
Three countries can now jointly market their tourism products online with the launch of the first joint East African destination portal, visiteastafrica.org.
Kenya Tourism Board (KTB) CEO Betty Radier joined top tourism officials from Uganda and Rwanda in unveiling the platform at the Pearl of Africa Trade Expo held in Uganda at the weekend, a KTB statement issued on Sunday said.
“The portal will be a shared platform for tourism trade operators to place their multi-country packages promoting Kenya, Rwanda, and Uganda; and provide a new channel to reach regional and international audiences.”
It would also allow access to tourism information on products, experiences and destinations – all on a single platform with the aim of enhancing availability of information in the region as well as accessibility to the tourism supply chain.
READ: Kenya tourism will recover in two years – minister “The launch of the portal comes in stride with East Africa striving to work together for the betterment of her people. If ever there was a good time for Uganda, Rwanda, and Kenya to come together it is now. Our economies are growing stronger and travel has been made easier due to the great improvements in our infrastructure,” Radier said.
“The fact that member countries can easily access each other’s countries by road, rail, or even short distance flights should encourage more inter-country visits. Why travel the world when one has not explored the amazing beauty that East Africa as a whole has to offer?” she asked.
The KTB attended the expo aiming to strengthen Kenya’s ties with Uganda and Rwanda to form a formidable destination product. Radier challenged the East African community to have a taste of both business and leisure  at affordable rates by exploring what lay within East Africa.
“On behalf of our country Kenya and as a destination, we take this opportunity to welcome you all to visit Kenya and enjoy the best of both worlds.”
She reiterated Kenya’s commitment to placing East Africa on the map by promoting sustainability of Kenya as a destination product for generations to come.
“With the year 2017 being the year of sustainable tourism it is important for East Africa to partake in implementing sustainable tourism practices to ensure that the countries remain as choice destinations in Africa.”
Uganda was the region’s leading source of tourists to Kenya. Last year, the market recorded a remarkable growth of 75.7 percent increase in air arrivals, closing at 51,023 exclusive of cross border arrivals, up from 29,038 recorded in 2015, Radier said.
fonte www.enca.com

Torna a inizio pagina

 UGANDA: WHY ARE UGANDANS SO ANGRY?
20 february 2017
How economic success has tended to create more political trouble for Museveni than comfort.
Very many Ugandans are angry, very angry. They feel the country has lost direction. They argue that our politics is corrupted, our democracy in retreat, and elections are rigged. They say the economy is not growing, poverty is increasing, inequality is widening, and state capacity to deliver public goods and services has been grossly eroded. Yet the opposite is the case on almost all these issues. Uganda is more democratic today than ever before and elections are increasingly freer and fairer. The country is making massive and unprecedented investments in infrastructure that will give it future productivity gains. Yet when you cite evidence of all these, critics retort that the numbers are cooked.
It is not only people who in the opposition that are angry. Many people high in the government – ministers, ruling party MPs, top civil servants, leading business persons, prelates, intellectuals and even members of the First Family including President Yoweri Museveni and the First Lady, Janet Museveni, make these criticisms. For example, in her autobiography, ‘My Life’s Journey’, Mrs. Museveni, criticises rampant corruption, inefficiency, and incompetence in the government.
In meetings I have attended with the President and government officials, Museveni always expresses frustration with the public sector’s inability to perform its functions. Even in some of his public speeches he sounds more like an opposition politician than an incumbent president. Therefore, disillusionment with the status quo is a widely shared sentiment across Uganda’s political spectrum. Recently, a top public official told me that I have lost my journalistic quality of being critical and keeping government on its toes. He said that these days I sound like a government spokesperson.
Indeed, I have been involved in battles with many people in large part because I previously used to hold these doomsday feelings and articulate them myself. Over the years, I have increasingly moved away from relying largely on my feelings to comment on public affairs towards greater reliance on statistical data, empirical evidence, historical reflection and comparative studies to understand Uganda and explain it to my readers, viewers, and listeners. For that, many people accuse me of having been bribed by Museveni. I am still waiting for my cheque!
But let me digress a bit to some kind of mini autobiography. I am inherently suspicious of majoritarian views and, therefore, I am always inclined to be more skeptical about what is the most popular and widely accepted version of things. I have rarely found myself on the side of the majority on any issue – whether it is corruption being an impediment to growth or foreign direct investment being a solution to our development predicament or the greatness of Barack Obama or the need for foreign aid to cure poverty.
This skepticism of the popular demands must have consolidated in me as a child when I read the story of Jesus Christ. In the Bible he is presented as a virtuous person, seeking to save the world. Then I would read and reread the chants of the majority shouting: “Crucify Him, Crucify Him.” When I was ten, I read about the ancient Greek philosopher, Socrates, who suffered a similar fate as Jesus. Plato presents him in virtuous terms – as the noblest and best human being that ever lived. Socrates always questioned common assumptions and certainties, a factor that irritated many Athenians and led that city’s democratic assembly to sentence him to death. This turned my dislike for majority positions into scorn.
Now let me revert to the subject of popular anger in Uganda; although it is understandable, it is not grounded in reality. One needs to read Samuel Huntington’s classic, ‘Political Order in Changing Societies’, to understand the dynamics behind Uganda’s political temperature today. Before Huntington, conventional wisdom in political science circles had always held that the poorer people are, the more they are likely to be politically disgruntled. Therefore, policy makers believed that governments should promote economic growth in order to achieve better economic security for citizens, which would lead to stability.
Using statistical evidence, Huntington turned this argument on its head. He argued that as the economy grows, it tends to produce many new social forces that seek to become more politically active (political participation) in ways that impact on government. According to Huntington, economic growth leads first to heightened inequality (an argument originally made by the Nobel laureate in economics, Simon Kuznets). Yet economic growth also stimulates social mobility for many people, which leads to heightened expectations that cannot be met at an early stage.
Heightened inequality in the context of overgrown yet “unrealisable” expectations causes social frustrations. This leads many people to seek political participation. Yet for Huntington, weakly institutionalised polities are easily overwhelmed by these new groups which enter politics (participate) on their own terms. This gives rise to praetorianism in which “the wealthy bribe, the students riot, the workers strike, mobs demonstrate and the military stage coups.”
I recently visited my former school, Mbarara High, and found many cars parked outside the administration block. When I walked into the staff room, I asked teachers which event was being held at the school. They said none and asked me why? I said there are many cars outside; so who are these visitors? They told me all those are teachers’ cars. In fact one teacher joked saying: “if you don’t own a car you cannot teach here”. Now I was at Mbarara High from 1989 to 1991 and not a single teacher, not even the headmaster, owned a car. The richest teachers used to ride bicycles.
There is a lot of evidence to show that Uganda enjoyed unprecedented economic growth and that this is widely shared. In fact Uganda has one of the best Gini Coeffecients in Africa at 0.395. The Gini measures income distribution where zero is perfect equality and one is perfect inequality. The only democracy in Africa with a better Gini than Uganda is Malawi. Uganda has a better Gini than Nigeria, Ghana, Zambia, Benin, Senegal, Kenya, South Africa, etc.
It seems to me that Uganda is suffering from the Huntington problem where rapid growth has produced many new social forces with overblown expectations that far exceed the ability of the economy to satisfy them. Ugandans are angry, not because Museveni has failed but because he has been very successful. Therefore, if the anger against him causes Museveni to be defeated in an election, it would not be a tragedy of excess but a tragedy of contradiction.
fonte allafrica.com

Torna a inizio pagina

ON THE ROAD WITH BODA-BODA, THE UBER OF UGANDA
24 february 2017
So I was recently sitting around doing nothing, an activity I’ve always found deeply satisfying, when I realized, “Hey, man, you’ve just written your 300th newspaper column.”
Next thing, my wife and kids were serving me cake with ice-cream and singing “Happy 300th.” (Do you know how disconcerting it is to hear “Happy 300th?”)
I then ruminated on all these columns, and so many from Africa, and there’s my motorcycle helmet in my closet for all these years, just sitting there, (but that’s another story), and in these 300 swings of the bat, not once (not once!) have I shared about the lowly boda-boda.
Yes, it was one day long ago when I first swung my leg over the back of this humble death machine. As a passenger. They’re good for that little ride to the bank. Or the pool. Or my favourite café. Or anywhere when I absolutely must beat Kampala’s notorious traffic. I bet I’ve ridden a boda-boda 300 times too.
To my wife’s wide-eyed dismay, I’ve occasionally put our kids on a boda-boda. (To my wife’s greater and unrivaled dismay, I’ve even gotten her on a boda-boda.)
It’s been a gas, being taxied on these light motorbikes that dot East Africa’s landscape. If you were flying overhead they’d look like, as my visiting cousin put it, a swarm of marching ants.
Boda-bodas arrived in Uganda in the 1960s, not long before I dreamed of getting my first minibike. Now Kampala alone has up to 300,000. Nobody knows their exact numbers because these taxi-bikes aren’t regulated. Laws for registration or safety aren’t followed or enforced. Just like nobody knows how many people are maimed or killed after flying off any old boda.
Few drivers are licensed. Or trained. Drivers’ helmets commonly stay perched on handlebars. But the olé Canadian-style tuque, often with a winter windbreaker, comes out if temps dip below 20C. Drivers often pair this attire with, naturally, the steady and sturdy African flip-flop.
Boda-bodas are called “motor” in nearby Rwanda. There, traffic is more civil. But in Tanzania, the term remains “boda-boda.” That country imported 185,000 last year, from India and China where they’re made.
And that unpretentious name? Some claim its etymology is from “border-border,” that boda-bodas cross without effort between any and all borders. (Borders otherwise known as trucks, cars, men, women, boys, girls, goats, cows and such on East Africa’s roads.)
I don’t buy it. I think “boda-boda” comes from some anonymous three-year-old pointing his finger at one. Like “brrm-brm.” (In Uganda, if you’d like something now, you’d say “now-now.” One “now” means any time between dinner and next week. But just one “boda” is required in speech by those of us so very conversant with all this.)
Of course, with all these boda rides it’s a wonder I’m still alive. Then again, I’m somehow more alive. That’s the thing about certain risky behaviour. It can put more zest in your day. Money, as expected, is behind the boda’s wild success. Where there’s demand, supply tends to pull up to say “hello.” A boda driver, without education or anything else, has an instant job. The boda’s owner, often not the driver, has an instant business. Owner and driver split the profits, which can easily hit 500,000 Ugandan Shillings, or about $180 Cdn, monthly.
My wife and I have helped several Ugandans make the investment. Think of Uber. Without the smartphone. And a little more dust. “We go?” is what the driver will ask when you hop on back. “We go.”
Uniformed school kids stacked several deep get rides to school. Women sit sidesaddle. (Without holding on, but often clutching a baby.) And the Paris Accord on climate change and fuel emissions? What’s Paris?
“I love it best with multiple passengers plus livestock,” is what my American friend told me yesterday. Think thin African chickens, feathers blowing in the breeze. Then there’s furniture of all varieties and sizes strapped and carried, somehow. Last week, my wife saw the ultimate load, one boda carrying another boda.
Yes, this is a faithful donkey of a machine. It’s not any stallion. This, I suppose, is why I’m so fond of it. And why I’ll miss it so much when I leave Uganda.
fonte allafrica.com

Torna a inizio pagina

 

UGANDA MIGHT SOON BE A ‘STRANGE’ LAND AND AFRICA A ‘NEW’ CONTINENT
24 february 2017
The old world order, many people argue, is ending. One result of it, they say, is the election of Donald Trump as president of the US. And, a little earlier, Britain’s vote to leave the European Union.
Angry at the present world where, according to Oxfam (that place where our own Winnie Byanyima is chief) says the gap between the super-rich and the poorest half of the global population has grown so stark that just eight men own as much wealth as 3.6 billion people, voters are rejecting the establishment and embracing dangerous demagogues. People are running back to the comfort of their caves, and the certainty of tribe, and so on.
Question then is, what is happening in Africa? One view is that outside West Africa, and pockets of southern Africa, democracy is sharply in decline. Corruption and state incompetence are deepening. The China-demand fuelled “Africa Rising” story of the years 2003 to 2015, has all but evaporated.
Nigeria and South Africa, the two giants that were supposed to lead Africa to great new prosperity have floundered. Muhammadu Buhari, who came to power in a wave of euphoria and optimism in Nigeria’s first opposition victory in 2015, is overwhelmed and is in hiding somewhere in London, recuperating.
A recent report noted that 20 per cent of the Nigerian currency, the naira, that is in circulation, is fake. But it is easy to list the mess, and we can fill this newspaper with that. It’s harder to see the changes and game-changing shifts, and what they mean. Unlike in the US, and Europe, I think the definitive changes in Africa are the positive ones, and forward-looking responses to crises that will unfold over the years. As this column noted before, one of the things strategic-minded people are watching out for in East Africa, is what some think will be the emergence of Tanzania as the largest economy in the East African Community (EAC), displacing Kenya.
What is really important about that is that it could disrupt more than 100 years of a regional economic system that was built around the Kenya-Uganda Railway.That could happen sooner than five years, according to some crystal ball gazers.
How, you might ask, would that affect the rest of the region? For starters, Lake Victoria would finally begin to rise as a critical economic zone because it would lead to the rise of Kisumu-Mwanza as the most important trade axis in the region.
Historically, Uganda built its trade infrastructure eastwards toward Kenya. With Tanzanian economic hegemony we would have to be western-facing, and gear all our infrastructure toward Bukoba.
Kenya and Uganda have never had to think and make key public and infrastructure investment this way. In re-orienting to these new realities, they will remake the countries they are and possibly unlock new energies. I don’t see nativism as their response.
Further away, at the weekend, Adama Barrow was formally inaugurated as president of The Gambia. He won elections in early December against the erratic and despotic former military Jahya Jammeh.
Jammeh first conceded defeat, then changed his mind a week later and said he wasn’t leaving. A crisis ensued, and neighbouring Senegal led a regional West African (Ecowas) force and chased him away last month. Barrow had been sworn in at the Gambian embassy in the Senegalese capital Dakar, where he had fled to escape the wrath of Jammeh. As soon as that was done, Ecowas moved to help him claim his electoral mandate.
Senegal’s soft-spoken president Macky Sall was the star of the inauguration. There were giant posters of him, with thank you messages, in the capital Banjul.
There was something unprecedented about that. The only time something close to it had happened was Tanzania statesman Julius Nyerere’s role in the ouster of military dictator Idi Amin in 1979.
Typically, all interventions in Africa to oust a toxic ruler by a regional bloc or a leader, have been spearheaded by a soldier-president or former rebel leader-turned civilian (for example Rwanda-Uganda-Angola-Zimbabwe against DR Congo’s Mobutu Sese Seko).
Sall was the first democratically elected (former opposition) leader to put his army at the head of an intervention to pressure a strongman to give up power to a democratically elected (former opposition) leader.
It’s the first time a pure civilian democratic leader in Africa has spent his political capital that way, and inserted his country’s military into an external regime change enterprise in that fashion.
The meaning of it shall soon be clear, but it was an intriguing and one of the rarest confluence for democracy we have seen in Africa between securocrats and politicians.It would seem from tracking social media, that that might have made a deeper impression on several Africans than even the Arab Spring did. What next?
fonte www.ntv.co.ug

Torna a inizio pagina

UGANDA: 12 MILLION FACE FOOD INSECURITY
28 february 2017
Number of people in need of relief food has risen from 1.3M last November to 3.5M today, says agriculture minister.
A new government report in Uganda found that 12 million people in the East African nation are experiencing food insecurity.
Speaking alongside various government officials and ambassadors from various European nations, as well as Turkey and China, Ugandan Agriculture Minister Vincent Sempijja said the country is facing a scarcity of water and pasture land as a result of last year’s prolonged dry spell.
“The number of people in need of relief food has increased from 1.3 million in November 2016 to 3.5 million today,” he added, at a meeting on food security, held in part to publicize the release of the report, which was written with support from UN agencies.
He said the Agriculture Ministry is working hard “to meet relief food, provision of quick maturing and drought resistance seeds, control of pests, and disease and provision of water for livestock.”
The report shows that 10.9 million Ugandans are experiencing food insecurity and another 1.6 million are in a crisis, meaning about one-third of the population is experiencing severe food shortage, deteriorating dietary diversity, and high malnutrition.
The overwhelming influx of refugees from the war-torn nation of South Sudan has also increased demand for food and services in refugee-hosting districts. More than 1.5 million South Sudanese refugees have fled to neighboring countries in the region, and half of them to Uganda. In 2017 alone, more than 116,000 South Sudanese refugees have fled to Uganda.
In response to the crisis, the World Bank has now triggered disaster risk financing through various projects in northern Uganda worth $40 million and $140 million for agriculture cluster projects in drought-stricken areas. Christina Malmberg Calvo, Uganda’s World Bank country manager, warned that if poor and vulnerable households in the country are not supported, they could resort to such coping mechanisms as “reducing the food they consume, withdrawing children from school, and selling the few productive assets they have in acts of desperation”.
fonte www.worldbulletin.net

Torna a inizio pagina


 Cambio valuta: in data 28/02/2017 1 dollaro USA è pari a 3.551 scellini ugandesi, 1 Euro è pari a 3.737 scellini ugandesi.
UgandAbout è un servizio di Italia Uganda Onlus a cura di Lucia Supino.

Torna alla pagina precedente


Lascia una risposta

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *

È possibile utilizzare questi tag ed attributi XHTML: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>