2017

31.07

UgandAbout

Ugandabout – luglio 2017

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Alcune notizie sull’Uganda e sull’Africa recuperate da internet nel luglio 2017.

UGANDA TO IMPORT NEW ARV LAUNCHED IN KENYA
july 2 2017

RAIDS ON UGANDA SHOW SOUTH SUDAN’S WAR SPILLING ACROSS ITS BORDERS
july 3 2017

LA CRISI DEI RIFUGIATI PIU’ GRANDE AL MONDO E’ IN SUD SUDAN
4 luglio 2017

UGANDA TARGETS TO INCREASE COFFEE PRODUCTION
july 4 2017

SUD SUDAN COME LA GUERRA HA DISTRUTTO IL GRANAIO DEL PAESE
5 luglio 2017

UGANDA HOSTS SCIENTIFIC CONFERENCE ON HIV, TB
july 5 2017

DIABETES TAKING GROWING TOLL ON AFRICA
july 6 2017

UGANDA RAISES 2017 TEA CROP FORECAST 7% AFTER RAINS REVIVE CROP
July 6 2017

AFRICA ORIENTALE, L’ALLERTA DELLA FAO: E’ LA TERZA STAGIONE CONSECUTIVA SENZA PIOGGE E DILAGA LA FAME
14 luglio 2017

I DATI ONU: L’AFRICA NON PERDE LA FORZA DI ACCOGLIERE
16 luglio 2017

HEPATITIS B AFFECTS 3.5 MILION UGANDANS
july 20 2017

UN CUSCINO PER IL PARTO SALVA VITE IN AFRICA
21 luglio 2017

CHRONIC DISEASES: THE NEW CHALLENGE FOR UGANDA’S HEALTH SYSTEM
july 24 2017

UGANDA: MPS APPLAUD NEW DRAFT CHILD POLICY
july 24 2017

PARLIAMENT FLAGS OFF UGANDAN STUDENTS FOR WORLD DEBATE COMPETITION
30 june 2017


UGANDA TO IMPORT NEW ARV LAUNCHED IN KENYA
july 2 2017

As Kenya launches a new effective Dolutegravir (DTG) anti-Aids drug, Uganda will starting importing the same drug mid this month, starting with those patients who are resistant to the already existing first line drugs.
The Kenyan government on Wednesday rolled out a plan to invest KShs7.5b (Shs259b) annually on a local plant that will make the antiretroviral drugs following the country’s partnership with Global Fund, and the US President’s Emergency Plan for Aids Relief (PEPFAR).
Dr Joshua Musinguzi, the Aids Control Programme manager at the Ministry of Health, told Sunday Monitor that they want to observe the drug’s effectiveness so that by the time pharmaceutical companies bring the fixed combination of the drug on market in 2018, they already have evidence-based data.
“At the moment, the drug is still a single combination pill which has to be taken together with another combination of Tenofavir and Lamivudine and we are trying to do away with multiple drugs because people do not want to take many tablets a day,” Dr Musinguzi said.
He, however, could not state whether government or other funders would bankroll the new drug and neither could he state how much it would cost.
Kenya’s programme, Dr Musinguzi said, is the same arrangement under which Uganda and several other African countries are partnering with the Clinton Health Access Initiative and Unitaid, an International drug purchasing facility, to introduce the drug under the brand name Tivicay.
GlaxoSmithKline through ViiV Health care currently manufactures the drug.
Ms Stella Kentusi, the executive director of National Forum of People Living with HIV & Aids Networks in Uganda, a community-based organisation that supports people living with HIV/Aids, said they have been advocating for the same drug to be introduced in Uganda since it has lesser side effects.
“DTG comes as a much better version with the same efficacy and less side effects,” Ms Kentusi said, adding that she hopes government makes it available as early as possible as opposed to next year.
She said the latest drug reduces the burden of swallowing multiple pills and also breaks the burden of patient being on one same treatment for a long time. Mr Nevin Bradford, the chief executive officer of Cipla Quality Chemical Industries Limited (CQCI), which manufactures ARVs in Uganda, told Sunday Monitor that the company also has plans to roll out a new HIV/Aids drug.
“At the moment we don’t manufacture the drug that was introduced in Kenya but it is under consideration,” Mr Bradford said.
He added the CiplaQCI manufactures about six ARVs in different combinations.
Mr Emmanuel Katongole, a director at CiplaQCI, said the company is in the process of rolling out a triple-combination drug but he was quick to indicate that the currently manufactured drugs are still effective.
“According the Ministry of Health reports and guidelines, our first choice drug is still effective. So there is not yet a need for a new one,” he added.
Mr Katongole said Kenya is likely to be the first country to introduce Dolutegravir on the African continent.
In 2004, Quality Chemicals Limited (QCL) convinced Indian drug maker Cipla to go into a joint venture with QCL and the government of Uganda to establish a pharmaceutical plant in Uganda. The factory was commissioned in 2007 with a capacity of six million pills daily.
Dolutegravir – Dolutegravir is a prescription medicine for treatment of HIV infection in adults and children who weigh at least 66 pounds (30 kilograms). Dolutegravir is always used in combination with other HIV medicines.
Dolutegravir belongs to a class of HIV drugs called integrase inhibitors. Integrase inhibitors block an HIV enzyme called integrase. By blocking integrase, integrase inhibitors prevent HIV from multiplying and can reduce the amount of HIV in the body.
HIV medicines can’t cure HIV/Aids, but taking a combination of HIV medicines every day helps people with HIV live longer, healthier lives. HIV medicines also reduce the risk of HIV transmission.
fonte: allafrica.com – Lilian Namagembe and Emmanuel Ainebyoona

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RAIDS ON UGANDA SHOW SOUTH SUDAN’S WAR SPILLING ACROSS ITS BORDERS
july 3 2017
Men wearing South Sudanese military uniforms have launched two raids on a hamlet over the border in Uganda in recent weeks, residents said, stealing cattle and raising fears that a near four-year-old conflict is spreading.
The gunmen also tried to seize refugees from Gbari in the first reported attacks on Ugandan soil since the start of South Sudan’s civil war, locals told Reuters.
“I am afraid, they may come … and burn all the houses,” said Martin Koma, 44, from the village.
South Sudan’s army denied any involvement. But the reports will alarm regional and world powers, struggling to contain ethnically-charged killings and atrocities that the U.N. has warned could lead to genocide.
South Sudanese gunmen have already killed and kidnapped hundreds in cross-border raids in Ethiopia.
Koma said about 26 gunmen attacked Gbari on the morning of June 17, identifying themselves as South Sudanese military and taking 108 cattle.
Three days later, a second group attacked and arrested two South Sudanese refugees living in the village.
“One ran away, the second one because … he looks like Dinka, they left him,” Koma said. The military is dominated by the Dinka, the president’s ethnic group.
Koma said the gunmen were very hostile to the first man, from South Sudan’s minority Kuku tribe, before he got away.
Ugandan military spokesman Brigadier Richard Karemire confirmed the raids on Gbari, without commenting on who carried them out.
South Sudan’s military denied involvement, saying is had received no complaint from Uganda and that the gunmen could have been anyone wearing South Sudanese uniforms.
This is untrue,” military spokesman Colonel Santo Domic Chol told Reuters. “This is completely negative propaganda by somebody … trying to tarnish the image of the (military).”
Atrocities – U.N. bodies and rights groups have accused both Sudan’s army and the rebel groups it is fighting of atrocities in the conflict that erupted just two years after South Sudan declared independence from Sudan.
Fighting started spreading in December 2013 after President Salva Kiir, a Dinka, fired his vice president and long-term rival, Riek Machar, a Nuer.
The explosion of ethnic violence that followed has uprooted nearly a quarter of the country’s population of 12 million, creating the biggest refugee crisis since the genocide in Rwanda, another of Uganda’s neighbors.
Nearly a million South Sudanese have fled to neighboring Uganda, many from minority tribes. Ugandan authorities have tightened security at refugee camps in recent days, fearing armed groups could try and abduct refugees from rival ethnic groups, police said.
“We have increased our intelligence and security alertness … because of signs some bad elements could want to cause insecurity in the camps,” said Musiho Abubakar, the police commander in Uganda’s northwestern Yumbe district.
Last month, Ugandan soldiers shot a South Sudanese man they suspected of plotting to harm refugees, a security source in Yumbe said. Yumbe hosts Bidi Bidi camp, a sprawling, semi-arid stretch of red, stony earth home to 270,000 South Sudanese refugees.
The man entered Uganda via a border village near Gbari, said officials. Locals reported him to the military on June 22.
Ugandan soldiers confronted him, but “instead of raising his hands, he wanted to pick a pistol from his pocket, then UPDF (Ugandan soldiers) shot him,” the source said.
A medical official said the man had been taken to a health center in Yumbe town with an injured arm. Police and soldiers were guarding him, the official said. Reuters could not reach him for comment. “He was planning to come … and start killing government enemies one by one,” the security source said, without going into further details.
Karemire confirmed the incident, saying that the armed man had described himself as a South Sudanese brigadier general, though his own investigations indicated he was a lieutenant.
South Sudanese military spokesman Chol denied any knowledge of the man.
fonte: reuters.com – Elias Biryabarema

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LA CRISI DEI RIFUGIATI PIU’ GRANDE AL MONDO E’ IN SUD SUDAN
4 luglio 2017
Quasi un milione di sfollati nella regione di Equatoria, civili uccisi, donne e bambine rapite e sottoposte a stupri di gruppo. La tragedia del Sud Sudan raccontata in un rapporto diffuso oggi da Amnesty International
È la crisi rifugiati che sta crescendo più rapidamente al mondo quella nella regione di Equatoria, dove un nuovo fronte del conflitto del Sud Sudan ha causato atrocità, terrore e fame e costretto nell’ultimo anno centinaia di migliaia di persone ad abbandonare questa area del Paese particolarmente fertile. In un rapporto di Amnesty International pubblicato oggi, emerge infatti chiaramente come le forze governative ma anche quelle di opposizione abbiano commesso crimini di diritto internazionale, compresi crimini di guerra, contro la popolazione civile, costretta a fuggire verso l’Uganda. Un esodo di quasi 1 milione di persone.
“L’aumento delle ostilità nella regione di Equatoria ha significato brutalità ancora più diffuse contro i civili. Uomini, donne e bambini sono stati uccisi, pugnalati a morte coi machete e bruciati vivi nelle loro abitazioni. Donne e bambine sono state rapite e sottoposte a stupri di gruppo”, ha dichiarato Donatella Rovera, Alta consulente di Amnesty International per le risposte alle crisi, appena rientrata dal Sud Sudan. “Abitazioni, scuole, ambulatori e sedi delle organizzazioni umanitarie… tutto è stato razziato, vandalizzato e raso al suolo. Il cibo è usato come arma di guerra”, ha accusato Rovera, che ha sottolienato come “Centinaia di migliaia di persone che solo un anno fa si sentivano al riparo dal conflitto, ora sono sfollate”.
Per quasi tre anni la regione di Equatoria, nella parte meridionale del Sud Sudan, era stata prevalentemente risparmiata dal conflitto esploso nel 2013 tra le forze dell’Esercito popolare di liberazione del Sudan fedeli al presidente Salva Kiir e quelle legate all’allora vicepresidente Riek Machar.
Intorno alla metà del 2016 sia le forze governative che quelle di opposizione si sono dirette verso Yei, un centro strategico di 300.000 abitanti 150 chilometri a sud-ovest della capitale Giuba, lungo un’importante arteria commerciale verso l’Uganda e la Repubblica Democratica del Congo.
Le forze governative, appoggiate da milizie locali tra cui la famigerata e impunita “Mathian Anyoor” (composta per lo più da giovani combattenti di etnia dinka), si sono rese responsabili di una lunga serie di violazioni dei diritti umani. Sebbene su scala minore, anche i gruppi armati di opposizione hanno compiuto gravi abusi.
Il solo modo di essere al sicuro per donne e ragazze è quello di essere morte. Non c’è modo di esserlo fino a quando sei viva. È brutto da dire ma la situazione è questa”… Mary, 23 anni, madre di cinque figli
Massacri e uccisioni deliberate – Numerosi testimoni oculari dei villaggi intorno a Yei hanno raccontato ad Amnesty International come le forze governative e le milizie loro alleate abbiano ucciso numerosi civili in modo deliberato e con accanimento.
Gli attacchi contro i villaggi da parte delle forze governative paiono spesso motivati dal desiderio di rappresaglia contro le forze armate di opposizione attive nella zona. I combattenti dell’opposizione hanno a loro volta compiuto uccisioni deliberate di civili sospettati di parteggiare per il governo o per il solo fatto di essere di etnia dinka o rifugiati provenienti dai monti Nuba, ritenuti dalla parte del governo.
Stupri e altra violenza sessuale e di genere – Con l’intensificazione dei combattimenti, il numero dei rapimenti e degli stupri di donne e bambine è cresciuto vertiginosamente.
Le donne rischiano di essere stuprate soprattutto quando, a causa della scarsità del cibo e dei continui saccheggi, vanno a cercare qualcosa da mangiare nei campi intorno ai villaggi.
Il cibo come arma di guerra – L’accesso della popolazione civile al cibo è estremamente limitato. Sia il governo che i gruppi di opposizione hanno bloccato le forniture in determinate zone, si dedicano a saccheggiare i mercati e le abitazioni private e prendono di mira chi prova a passare lungo la linea del fronte anche con una minima quantità di cibo. Ognuna delle parti accusa i civili di passare cibo a quella avversa o di essere sfamata da questa.
A Yei, dove la maggior parte degli abitanti è fuggita nel corso dell’ultimo anno, i pochi civili rimasti sono praticamente sotto assedio. Non potendo più andare in cerca di cibo nei campi, soffrono per la grave penuria di prodotti alimentari.
fonte: vita.it

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UGANDA TARGETS TO INCREASE COFFEE PRODUCTION
july 4 2017
The roadmap aims at increasing coffee production from 4 million bags per year to 20 million bags per year in 2025.
Uganda Coffee Development Authority (UCDA) and Uganda Cooperative Alliance (UCA) will today (Wednesday) sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) at UCDA’s headquarters at Coffee House in Kampala.
We are excited to be partnering with Uganda Cooperative Alliance,” said Dr Emmanuel Iyamulemye Niyibigira, managing director UCDA. “We believe that through this collaboration we will strengthen farmers through recruiting farmer organisations, cooperatives and associations across the country.”
UCDA is a statutory body with a mandate to oversee the coffee industry by supporting research, promoting production, controlling coffee quality and improving marketing of coffee in order to optimise foreign exchange earnings for the country.
According to Iyamulemye the partnership with UCA is in line with the coffee roadmap that was recently launched by President Yoweri Museveni. The roadmap aims at increasing coffee production from 4 million bags per year to 20 million bags per year in 2025. UCA is an umbrella body of cooperatives in Uganda registered in 1961.
“It will help to train farmers in leadership and business development, and facilitate the distribution of inputs, provision of water for irrigation, access to finance including credit and risk management, advocacy, collective marketing as well as community mobilisation,” added Iyamulemye.
The goal of the memorandum of understanding is to have all farmers join farmer organisations that provide members with services required to drive farmer production and productivity and to make the organisations self-sustaining entities.
fonte: newvision.co.ug – John Odyek

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SUD SUDAN COME LA GUERRA HA DISTRUTTO IL GRANAIO DEL PAESE
5 luglio 2017
Solo un anno fa, la produzione agricola della regione di  Equatoria era sufficiente a  sfamare milioni di sudsudanesi. Da quando la guerra civile scoppiata nel 2013 è arrivata lì, il granaio è diventato un campo di morte, teatro di ripetuti crimini di guerra, e quasi un milione di persone si è riversato nella vicina Uganda.
Per quasi tre anni la regione era stata prevalentemente risparmiata dal conflitto. Intorno alla metà del 2016 sia le forze fedeli al presidente Salva Kiir che quelle legate all’ex presidente Riek Machar si sono dirette verso Yei, un centro strategico di 300.000 abitanti 150 chilometri a sud-ovest della capitale Giuba, lungo un’importante arteria commerciale verso l’Uganda e la Repubblica Democratica del Congo.
Una missione di ricerca di Amnesty International è appena tornata dal Sud Sudan e ha reso noto ieri quanto ha visto: uomini, donne e bambini uccisi, pugnalati a morte coi machete e bruciati vivi nelle loro abitazioni; donne e ragazze rapite e sottoposte a stupri di gruppo; abitazioni, scuole, ambulatori e uffici delle organizzazioni umanitarie razziati, vandalizzati e rasi al suolo.
La maggior parte delle violazioni delle leggi di guerra chiama in causa le forze governative, appoggiate da milizie locali tra cui la famigerata e impunita “Mathian Anyoor” (composta per lo più da giovani combattenti di etnia dinka) ma, sebbene su scala minore, anche i gruppi armati di opposizione hanno compiuto gravi abusi.
Tutto questo è ancora in corso, sotto gli occhi della missione di peacekeeping delle Nazioni Unite.
Il cibo è usato come arma di guerra. Sia il governo che i gruppi di opposizione hanno bloccato le forniture in determinate zone, si dedicano a saccheggiare i mercati e le abitazioni private e prendono di mira chi prova a passare lungo la linea del fronte anche con una minima quantità di cibo. Ognuna delle parti accusa i civili di passare cibo a quella avversa o di essere sfamata da questa.
A Yei, dove la maggior parte degli abitanti è fuggita nel corso dell’ultimo anno, i pochi civili rimasti sono praticamente sotto assedio. Non potendo più andare in cerca di cibo nei campi, soffrono per la grave penuria di prodotti alimentari.
Il 22 giugno le Nazioni Unite hanno ammonito che l’insicurezza alimentare ha raggiunto livelli senza precedenti in Sud Sudan.
fonte: corriere.it – Riccardo Noury

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UGANDA HOSTS SCIENTIFIC CONFERENCE ON HIV, TB
july 5 2017
The researchers will discuss questions of access and diagnosis, as well as treatment failure.
Health researchers from across the world meet in Uganda on Wednesday for the 2017 Epicentre Scientific Day to share findings on HIV and Tuberculosis control in Africa.
The conference, to be held at Serena International Conference centre in Kampala will examine the progress on prevention, diagnosis and treatment of HIV and Tuberculosis, especially among adolescents.
The researchers will discuss questions of access and diagnosis, as well as treatment failure in very specific patients, children and adolescents.
The researchers will also discuss antibiotic resistance, infection prevention and control measures that can help lead to a decrease in disease progression.
Preliminary findings indicate that more than 15 years after the introduction of antiretrovirals (ARVs) to African programs for managing patients who are seropositive for HIV, many challenges remain.
The researchers will examine epidemiology programs in northern Nigeria, Iraq, and Uganda and Greece that are hosting huge numbers of refugees.
The conference is based on studies conducted by Epicentre Uganda, a research centre that conducts studies on public health issues in Uganda and Africa.
fonte: newvision.co.ug – Taddeo Bwambale

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DIABETES TAKING GROWING TOLL ON AFRICA
july 6 2017
The costs of diabetes in sub-Saharan Africa could double to almost $60 billion annually just 13 years from now, as obesity fuels an explosion of the disease, a report said Thursday.
In 2015, the overall diabetes cost in the region was nearly $20 billion (18 billion euros), or 1.2 percent of total economic production, according to research published by The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.
This included medication and hospital stays, and loss of labour productivity due to illness or death.
About half of all treatment costs were paid for by patients themselves.
“We estimate that the total cost will increase to between $35.33 billion (1.1 percent of GDP) and $59.32 billion (1.8 percent of GDP) by 2030,” said the report compiled by more than 70 experts from around the world.
The rise of Type 2 or adult-onset diabetes in sub-Saharan Africa has been fuelled by growing disposable income to spend on junk food, the shift to a more sedentary urban lifestyle, population growth and population ageing as healthcare improves.
The number of adults in the region classified as overweight increased from 28 million in 1980 to 127 million in 2015.
While in 1990, HIV/AIDS, diarrhoea, malaria and children’s diseases were among the region’s leading causes of death, today they are being replaced by heart disease.
“Diabetes and its complications have the potential to reverse some of the health gains seen in sub-Saharan Africa in recent years — overwhelming the region’s health system and crippling patients’ personal finances as they pay for their own healthcare,” a statement said.
Today, only about half of diabetes sufferers in the region know they have the disease, and just one in ten receives the necessary drugs.
“In its current state, sub-Saharan Africa is not at all prepared for the increasing burden of diabetes caused by rapid, ongoing societal transitions,” said lead author Rifat Atun of Harvard University.
Diabetes is a lifelong disorder that causes blood-sugar levels to be too high. Untreated, it can cause blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks and stroke.
According to the World Health Organization, an estimated 1.5 million deaths in 2012 were directly caused by diabetes.
fonte: independent.co.ug

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UGANDA RAISES 2017 TEA CROP FORECAST 7% AFTER RAINS REVIVE CROP
july 6 2017
Possible for nation to surpass record if weather good: Growers
Increased planting, including in new areas, also helps harvest
Uganda, Africa’s third-biggest tea producer, increased its forecast for production for 2017 as rains earlier this year help revive a crop that had been damaged by drought.
Output may climb to 60 million kilograms (132 million pounds) from an initial forecast that production would hold steady at 56 million to 57 million kilograms from the previous year, George William Ssekitoleko, executive secretary of the Kampala-based Uganda Tea Association, said in a phone interview Thursday.
Rains from March to May rejuvenated the crop after drought last year and early this year cut yields, Ssekitoleko said. Also, “there has been increased planting, including introducing the crop in new areas,” he said.
It’s possible for the East African nation, with 40,000 hectares (99,000 acres) cultivated, to surpass record output of 66 million kilograms in 2014 if the weather is good, Ssekitoleko said.
Uganda exports at least 95 percent of its crop, mainly through the world’s biggest tea auction in Mombasa, Kenya, according to the association, which represents growers and exporters. Kenya and Malawi are the biggest tea producers in Africa.
The Ugandan unit of McLeod Russel India Ltd. accounts for about a quarter of the African nation’s production, according to the association.
fonte: bloomberg.com – Fred Ojambo

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AFRICA ORIENTALE, L’ALLERTA DELLA FAO: E’ LA TERZA STAGIONE CONSECUTIVA SENZA PIOGGE E DILAGA LA FAME
14 luglio 2017
Le scarse precipitazioni in Africa orientale hanno peggiorato la fame e hanno lasciato terra bruciata, pascoli asciutti e migliaia di animali morti – secondo un’allerta pubblicata oggi dalla FAO. Le zone più colpite, dove le piogge sono state metà delle normali precipitazioni stagionali, sono la Somalia centrale e meridionale, l’Etiopia sudorientale, il Kenya settentrionale e orientale, la Tanzania settentrionale e l’Uganda nord-orientale e sud-occidentale. L’allarme emesso dal Global Information and Early Warning System (GIEWS) della FAO, (il Sistema d’informazione globale e di allarme rapido) avverte che la scarsità di precipitazioni per il terzo anno consecutivo ha gravemente eroso la capacità di risposta delle famiglie e richiede un sostegno urgente ed efficace ai mezzi di sussistenza. “Questa è la terza stagione consecutiva durante la quale le famiglie hanno dovuto fare i conti con la mancanza di precipitazioni – stanno semplicemente esaurendo i modi per farvi fronte”, ha dichiarato il Direttore delle Emergenze della FAO, Dominique Burgeon. “Occorre portare assistenza adesso, prima che la situazione si deteriori ulteriormente”.
Gli aiuti umanitari riguardano 16 milioni di persone. Aumenta il numero di persone che hanno bisogno degli aiuti umanitari. Il numero di persone che necessitano di assistenza umanitaria nei cinque paesi menzionati, attualmente stimato intorno a 16 milioni, è aumentato di circa il 30% dalla fine del 2016. In Somalia, quasi la metà della popolazione soffre la fame e l’assistenza tempestiva ha evitato finora la carestia, ma va sostenuta. Si prevede che le condizioni in tutta la regione peggioreranno ulteriormente nei prossimi mesi con l’inizio della stagione secca e con un anticipato inizio precoce della stagione magra. In Etiopia, Kenya e Somalia la situazione della sicurezza alimentare per i pastori è particolarmente preoccupante. I tassi di mortalità animale sono elevati e la produzione di latte degli animali sopravvissuti è diminuita notevolmente con conseguenze negative sulla sicurezza alimentare e sulla nutrizione.
Sfavorevoli le prospettive dei raccolti e dei prezzi degli animali. Sono diminuiti tutti i prezzi a causa delle loro cattive condizioni e questo, unitamente ai prezzi alti dei cereali, ha severamente limitato l’accesso al cibo. Le condizioni del bestiame e dei pascoli si prevede peggioreranno almeno fino alla prossima stagione delle piogge che inizia in ottobre. In diverse aree agricole della regione le piogge scarse hanno causato una forte riduzione delle semine e la perdita delle coltivazioni in fase di raccolta. Nonostante alcune piogge tardive nel mese di maggio, i danni alle colture sono irreversibili. Inoltre, la Spodoptera exempta, un parassita africano dell’ordine dei lepidotteri, che ha provocato notevoli danni alle colture di mais dell’Africa meridionale, si è diffuso verso est e farà peggiorare la situazione. In Kenya, il parassita ha finora colpito circa 200.000 ettari di colture, e in Uganda oltre la metà dei 111 distretti del paese. I prezzi dei cereali sono in aumento, trainati dalle scarse forniture e dalle preoccupazioni per l’esito incerto dei raccolti nella stagione corrente. I prezzi in maggio hanno raggiunto livelli quasi-record nella maggior parte dei mercati e fino al doppio dello scorso anno.
fonte: repubblica.it

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I DATI ONU: L’AFRICA NON PERDE LA FORZA DI ACCOGLIERE
16 luglio 2017
L’Uganda ha aperto le porte a 900mila persone in fuga da uccisioni e stupri. I principali motori dell’esodo sono il jihadismo e le lotte tribali, fomentate dalla fame di risorse naturali
La Repubblica democratica del Congo (Rdc) ha raggiunto, la settimana scorsa, la più alta concentrazione di sfollati in Africa. Oltre 3,8 milioni di profughi. «Nella Rdc è in atto un cambio significativo del conflitto – sostiene l’Onu –: le tensioni tra le comunità stanno crescendo radicalmente e le violenze colpiscono nuove aree del Paese». Nonostante la complessità delle dinamiche dei massacri nella provincia centrale del Kasai o di quella nordorientale del Kivu, la ragione della strage è principalmente una sola: la fame a livello internazionale di risorse naturali. Una corsa disperata verso diamanti, oro, petrolio, rame, cobalto, coltan, ferro e molto altro. Per salvarsi dall’escalation, centinaia di migliaia di persone si riversano negli Stati limitrofi: Ruanda, Burundi, Uganda. Nel vicino Sud Sudan, la crisi dei profughi è stata definita come «la più veloce a crescere a livello mondiale ». Si stima che i bambini fuggiti dalla guerra civile in corso siano «due milioni».
Alcuni rimangono nel Paese, altri scappano da soli o con la famiglia e vanno a costituire il 62 per cento degli oltre 1,8 milioni di rifugiati che raggiungono Uganda, Kenya, Etiopia e Sudan. «Nessuna crisi come quella sudsudanese mi preoccupa più al mondo – ha dichiarato, lo scorso maggio, Valentin Tapsoba, funzionario dell’Alto commissariato Onu per i rifugiati (Acnur) –. Il fatto che siano dei bambini rifugiati a diventare il volto di questo conflitto è estremamente fastidioso». Le strutture d’accoglienza in Uganda faticano a contenere gli arrivi. «Più di 900mila rifugiati, l’86 per cento donne e bambini, hanno raggiunto l’Uganda per sfuggire a uccisioni, stupri e altre violazioni dei diritti umani – afferma un recente rapporto di Amnesty International –. I Paesi ricchi non stanno aiutando ». Al contrario, l’Uganda è stata celebrata dal quotidiano statunitense, Washington Post, come «un esempio di compassione e generosità verso i profughi».
Nel Corno d’Africa, invece, la crisi somala – in corso ormai da trent’anni – è il principale motore dell’esodo. Un misto di guerra e carestia sta divorando il Paese, costringendo alla fuga circa un milione di persone. Molti di essi hanno raggiunto il più grande campo profughi al mondo: Dadaab, nel nord-est del Kenya. Un luogo che le autorità di Nairobi vorrebbero chiudere. Per ora, gli occupanti vivono in una sorta di limbo: chi ha provato a tornare in Somalia, ha visto un territorio devastato, ed è tornato indietro. Altri invece sono rimasti con la paura di essere bollati come «illegali» o «terroristi», e soffrire delle aggressioni da parte delle forze di sicurezza.
In Eritrea, è la feroce dittatura di Isaias Afewerki a spingere i propri cittadini verso l’estero. Molti si fermano nei Paesi confinanti, altri si avventurano passando per il Sudan e la Libia con la speranza di raggiungere soprattutto l’Inghilterra. Dall’altra parte del Continente, dove imperversa un conflitto di matrice jihadista e separatista, la situazione non accenna a migliorare. Mauritania, Burkina Faso, Senegal e Costa d’Avorio continuano a ricevere rifugiati della guerra civile nel nord del Mali. Una situazione simile caratterizza il nordest della Nigeria. Là, i jihadisti di Boko Haram hanno lanciato un’offensiva che dura dal 2009. Sono oltre 20mila i morti (altre fonti parlano di 100mila). Una crisi che sta avendo drammatiche ripercussioni in Ciad, Niger e Camerun. In quest’ultimo Paese sono arrivate 91mila persone, molte delle quale stanno rientrando in Nigeria volontariamente, mentre altre vengo rimpatriate dalle autorità locali.
Sempre in Nigeria, come in diversi Paesi dell’Africa occidentale, c’è, però, anche un’ondata di persone che a causa della mancanza di lavoro è spinta a cercare una vita migliore negli Stati più vicini. Un flusso assai difficile da misurare, ma imponente e continuo. Infine, ci sono i più disperati. Gli africani che s’imbarcano in Senegal per raggiungere la Spagna. Oppure quelli che passano per la città nigerina di Agadez, attraversano il deserto per arrivare in Libia, e poi pagano per imbarcarsi nel Mediterraneo e raggiungere l’Europa. Pochi sopravvivono.
fonte: avvenire.it – Matteo Fraschini Koffi

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HEPATITIS B AFFECTS 3.5 MILION UGANDANS
july 20 2017
Kabagambe said the prevalence rate of Hepatitis is 10% compared the 7.3% of HIV/AIDs in Uganda. Government has come up with a new strategy to fight Hepatitis B across the country.
Dr. Susan Nabadda, a Consultant Pathologist at Mulago Hospital, said that the Government’s strategy includes increasing access to laboratory tests for hepatitis up to the lower Health Centre III, controlling quality of testing, training and building capacity in diagnosing hepatitis and linking of people who have tested positive to health centers for viral load testing and treatment.
Others strategies are capturing data, boosting the supply chain for chemical and equipment to increase access to diagnosis. Currently, Ugandans pay a lot of money to test for Hepatitis, on vaccination and establishing the viral load.
Dr. Nabadda made the remarks on Wednesday during the launch of the Continuous Professional Development (CPD) programme that was organised by the Uganda Medical Laboratory Technology Association (UMLTA). CPD was rolled out to 112 districts in the country.
Brenda Mushabe, the UMLTA President noted that the CPD program is intended to improve laboratory professionalism since it is critical in shaping the health care delivery systems and vital in disease detection and follow-up of treatment outcomes in hospitals and health centres.
Mushabe said this year’s CPD, is  focusing on Hepatitis B, customer care and ethics and professionalism.
She said Hepatitis B is priority because it is a major health problem in Uganda with a prevalence of 10% (affecting 3.5million people in the population).
“Since lab professionals are at risk of getting exposed to infected blood and various body fluids in their routine work, this CPD program will give them skills on how to handle samples suspected of Hepatitis B,” Mushabe said.
In the same vein, Kenneth Kabagambe, the executive director of the National Organisation for People Living with Hepatitis B (NOPLHB), said 80% of the liver cancers in Uganda are also caused by Hepatitis.
Kabagambe said the prevalence rate of Hepatitis is 10% compared the 7.3% of HIV/AIDs in Uganda.
He said one of the biggest challenges in the fight against the disease is that people who test positive and are referred do not even know where to go.
“The few available facilities for testing Hepatitis viral load across the country are very expensive-charging between sh190,000 to sh400,000 which the common person cannot afford. But also, the absence of guidelines for health workers in the treatment of hepatitis has left them to try and error while handling such a serious disease,” he said.
Kabagambe said that due to the existing challenges in accessing treatment, many patients have been exploited by quacks who claim to treat the disease including traditional healers.
He urged stakeholders in the country’s health sector to ensure that their strategy against hepatitis fits into the World Health Organisation’s plan of eliminating hepatitis globally by 2021.
The Registrar of Allied Health Professional Council, Patrick Mpiima said CPD is intended to improve the quality of service delivery to ensure the laboratory professionals are not obsolete.
He noted that there has been a public outcry over incompetent laboratory technicians which CPD will address.  

fonte: newvision.co.ug – Cecilia Okoth, John Semakula

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UN CUSCINO PER IL PARTO SALVA VITE IN AFRICA
21 luglio 2017
Può un cuscino salvare la vita di una mamma e di un neonato, durante il delicato momento del parto? Sì. È la scommessa dei birth cushions di Cuamm-Medici con l’Africa, finalista al concorso “Saving Lives at Birth: A Grand Challenge for Development”, promosso dall’agenzia della cooperazione statunitense (USAID)
Può un cuscino salvare la vita di una mamma e di un neonato, durante il delicato momento del parto? Sì. È la scommessa dei birth cushions di Cuamm- Medici con l’Africa, che fin dal 2013 in Uganda sta implementano questa innovazione low-tech e a basso impatto economico, ma dall’elevato impatto sulla salute delle donne.
Per ragioni di cultura e tradizioni, le donne infatti della Karamoja continuavano a preferire il parto in casa a quello in struttura, perché in ospedale erano costrette a partorire distese: lo staff di Medici con l’Africa Cuamm ascoltando questa esigenza ha prodotto un prototipo di “cuscino per il parto”, su cui le donne possono partorire nella tradizionale posizione accucciata, assistite da un’ostetrica. In quattro anni i “cuscini per il parto” sono stati distribuiti in 81 centri di salute della Karamoja e le donne che si sono presentate in struttura per partorire, legato anche alla possibilità di farlo in maniera tradizionale, sono salite da 11.424 a 25.592 fra il 2012 e il 2015, con una copertura dei parti attesi nella regione salita dal 18% al 52%.
Oggi il cuscino per il parto è uno dei 53 progetti finalisti dell’evento “Saving Lives at Birth: A Grand Challenge for Development”, promosso dall’agenzia della cooperazione statunitense (USAID). Di 550 progetti, 53 sono arrivati in finale e Medici con l’Africa è l’unica organizzazione italiana ad essere presente: fino al 26 luglio è aperta la votazione online per il progetto ritenuto migliore, mentre fra il 25 e il 27 luglio il CUAMM sarà a Washington D.C. per presentare il progetto. Tutti i progetti di “Saving Lives at Birth: A Grand Challenge for Development” sono accomunati dalla potenzialità di avere un impatto sostanziale sulle condizioni sanitarie materno-infantili e di essere implementabili anche su larga scala.
Nei prossimi mesi il CUAMM ha in programma uno studio approfondito dell’uso dei “cuscini per il parto” come fattore di richiamo delle donne verso la struttura sanitaria: l’obiettivo è quello di estendere la disponibilità dello strumento a tutto il territorio dell’Uganda.
fonte: vita.it

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CHRONIC DISEASES: THE NEW CHALLENGE FOR UGANDA’S HEALTH SYSTEM
july 24 2017
When I was young, many people in Kampala walked or cycled to work. There were a few matatus and very few cars. It didn’t make us very productive but, we now know, it fended off many of the diseases that are so common across Europe and North America.
In the past 25 years, the population of Kampala has more than doubled. Traffic gridlocks the roads for much of the day. People laugh at the idea of cycling to work – in any case, it would be far too dangerous.
The growth of African cities is driving the growth of African wealth. But urbanization and economic development are unfortunately driving the growth of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). These chronic diseases, like hypertension, cancer and diabetes, are associated with the poor lifestyles many people adopt when moving to the city. The population is increasingly eating unhealthy, lacking exercise, smoking tobacco and abusing alcohol. Many are unaware that this type of lifestyle is storing up future health problems for them.
This growth in NCDs is a big issue for Uganda and its health system. Today, 25% of Ugandans die from an NCD, and the proportion is increasing every year. But we are still fighting the battle against many infectious diseases –such as malaria, meningitis and HIV –which are still the biggest killers of people in Uganda. Alongside these well-known diseases, we are seeing the emergence of chronic illnesses which are silent killers – often people don’t know they have high blood pressure until they have a stroke or a heart attack. Nearly a quarter of Uganda’s adult population has raised blood pressure. More than 75% of these people don’t know they have a problem, and are not on a medication to control their hypertension.
The Ministry of Health has already established an NCD program to coordinate efforts around prevention and control. But getting the healthcare resources we need for NCDs is challenging given that infectious diseases are still so prevalent. Government resources are limited, so NCDs will also need to fight for their fair share, despite their growing importance.
We are working together with partners and other stakeholders to draft policies and guidelines geared to prevent and control NCDs. The Minister of Health, Dr Jane Aceng, is very supportive of these efforts, as is the President. But we need more partnerships to fight NCDs.
fonte: newvision.co.ug – Prof. Anthony Mbonye

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UGANDA: MPS APPLAUD NEW DRAFT CHILD POLICY
24 july 2017
Legilsators sitting on the Uganda Parliamentary Forum for Children (UPFC) have welcomed a new draft policy for children which seeks to replace the the National Orphans and other Vulnerable Children (NOP) Policy.
Speaking at Serena hotel in Kampala on July 20, the MPs noted that as a country, Uganda must rise to the occasion and defend the interests of children who constitute a big percentage of the country’s 40 million people. The policy, Margaret Baba Diri, the woman MP for Koboko district said, is long overdue.
“We need a policy that caters for all the children especially children in war areas,” Baba Diri said.
Silas Aogon, Kumi municipality MP, called for periodic review of the policy in order to reflect the changing trends.
“As MPs, we must be part of the policy formulation because we are at the forefront of its implementation. We don’t need damage to first occur before we come up with a policy; let us stamp our foot when issues of children come up on the floor of parliament,” Aogon said.
Florence Namayanja, the MP for Bukoto East, called for investigations into the reasons for proliferation of children on streets in all major towns in the country. She said oftentimes; children in this category are not catered for in the law.
“We have been seeing children on Kampala streets but now they have stretched to all major towns of Uganda. Therefore, the policy should be specific on how to take care of these children,” Namayanja said.
For Joseph Ssewungu, MP Kalungu West, said Uganda is not short of good laws and policies but the problem is implementing them.
“Uganda is one of the countries in Africa with good policies that are not implemented; we need to push for this policy’s implementation,” Ssewungu said.
Bernard Atiku, UPFC chairman, said as members of the forum, they will work hard to ensure that the policy becomes a standard document that will withstand the test of time and deal with the current cases of child sacrifices, harmful practices and all other forms of children’s rights violations.
According to AfriChild Centre, a project under the Makerere University college of Humanities and Socal Sceinces (Chuss) that orgainsed the MP’s meeting, the overall child wellbeing and violence against children influenced the need to replace the Orphan and vulnerable children (OVC) policy that has been in existence for 12 years.
“These and other emerging trends necessitate a complete review of the existing OVC policy to respond and improve the quality of life of children in a comprehensive manner,” a concept paper by AfriChild reads in part.
In 2004, the government of Uganda through the ministry of Gender, Labour and Social Development developed the OVC policy whose goal was to ensure full development and realization of the rights of orphans and other vulnerable children. However, while the OVC-targeted interventions were on going, a situation analysis on child vulnerability indicated that nearly 96% of Uganda’s children were still vulnerable.
“This revelation requires a complete review of the OVC policy to improve the quality of lives of children in a comprehensive manner,” the concept paper says.
Meanwhile, the new policy notes that the realization of children’s right to protection from violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation continues to be a critical challenge of Uganda.
“The national child policy seeks to provide a framework for addressing issues related to children’s rights and wellbeing in a holistic manner. The policy does not seek to duplicate or replace existing policies and plans related to children but, rather, to bring together and harmonize those that are relevant to the survival, protection, development and participation of children in Uganda in a coherent framework,” partly reads the preamble of the draft policy.

fonte: allafrica.com – Baker Batte Lule

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PARLIAMENT FLAGS OFF UGANDAN STUDENTS FOR WORLD DEBATE COMPETITION
30 june 2017
Ogwal commended the National Debate Council (NDC) that selected the team members for considering Uganda’s diverse culture
EDUCATION – Parliament Friday flagged off the national team a head of the World Schools Debate Championships (WSDC) to represent Uganda in Indonesia.
Parliament commissioner also Dokolo Woman MP Cecilia Ogwal who represented Kadaga told the group not to despise themselves, but to have confidence, that will lead them to  win the competition, and  reflect the glory of   Uganda, the ‘Perl of Africa’.
Ogwal commended the National Debate Council (NDC) that selected the team members for considering Uganda’s diverse culture as well as including on the team a visually impaired person.
The group flying to Indonesia on Sunday (July 30th)  is led by Mahrukh Sajid from Muyenga High, Abbas Luyomba from Iganga SS,  Denis Musinguzi Kabila from Gombe SS and the 11-year-old Morgan Moconha from Galaxy International School.
Ogwal also encouraged the team to dream big by targeting to win against all the eight debate teams that will face Uganda in the first round which include; Greece,  South Africa, US, Mexico, Estonia, Mongolia and Czech Republic.
(WSDC)  an annual English-language debating tournament for high school-level teams representing over  90 countries including Uganda will participate in the competition that is slated for July 31st to 11th of August in Bali Indonesia.
National Debate Council (NDC) executive director, Gasta Kakaire said that the council is privileged to be leading the process of selecting, training and coaching the team of 4 debaters from 4 different schools to effectively represent the country.
Kakaire said   a wide range of topics and motions are expected to test the debaters on world economy, climate change, politics, trade, North Atlantic, Treaty Organization (NATO).
Kakaire said this team is mainly selected from the prestigious national schools debate championship organized annually by NDC and hosted by Parliament every December.
“Top debaters at this championship are selected to the National Team; the team has two speakers from this championship. However for as much inclusiveness as possible, we also looked for outstanding debaters from other smaller competitions and one from international schools,” Kakaire noted.
Kakaire appealed to government departments, ministries and the Parliament Committee on education to lobby for “mental sport” budgeted for just like “physical sport” and MDD.
Participants:11-year-old Morgan Naronha  of Galaxy International School , said : “I am not scared of the so-called big schools, I am not even scared that I will meet with other children internationally, I will concentrate on listening, viewing and reading   international and local issues All I want is to win, and yes I will do.”
The 19- year- old visually impaired Abbas Luyombo from  Iganga Iganga SS said,  “I’m not scared , my brains represent me I’m sure I will win.”
Team captain Sajid said that she is proud to lead the team and also glad that she has been chosen to debate despite societal restrictions on females in her country of Origin (Pakistan).
Basing on Uganda’s performance at the world level last year were Uganda didn’t register any win, I am too optimistic that this time round we shall register wins come 2nd August,” Sajid said.
The head Coach, Hillary Kururagyire asked Ogwal and the national female youth MP Anne Adeke to foster support towards intellectual sports in the country like debate.
fonte newvision.co.ug – Paul Kiwuuwa 

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