2012

03.12

UgandAbout

Ugandabout – novembre 2012

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Eccovi alcune notizie sull’Uganda e sull’Africa recuperate da internet nel novembre 2012.

INFLATION DROPS, PRICES STAY HIGH
1 november 2012

HOW DISTRICTS ARE FEEDING THEIR PUPILS
5 november 2012

THEMATIC CURRICULUM: SCHOOLS STILL GRAPPLING
5 november 2012

CORRUZIONE: AIUTI ESTERI SOTTRATTI, GOVERNO NELLA BUFERA
6 novembre 2012

UPE: STAGGERING 71% DROP-OUT RATE SO FAR
10 november 2012

AFRICA, LA GRAVIDANZA E IL PARTO MIETONO 200 MILA VITTIME L’ANNO
14 novembre 2012

BREVI DALL’AFRICA
15 novembre 2012

UGANDA CLOSES BORDER WITH DR CONGO
15 november 2012

PARCO DI BWINDI, AUMENTANO I GORILLA DI MONTAGNA
15 novembre 2012

EBOLA DEATHS AT FIVE AS 40 ARE MONITORED
19 november 2012

ENTRO IL 2025 UN BAMBINO SU TRE SARÀ AFRICANO
20 novembre 2012

UGANDA, 8.900 FAMIGLIE GRAVEMENTE DANNEGGIATE DALLE INONDAZIONI
22 novembre 2012

UGANDA: BEWARE, AIDS STILL KILLS!
29 november 2012


INFLATION DROPS, PRICES STAY HIGH
1 november 2012
Even as inflation remains under wraps, easing to 4.5 per cent in October, experts have warned that much more needs to be done for Ugandans to recover lost ground.
Mr Leonard Mutesasira, an economist and entrepreneur, told Daily Monitor on phone that Ugandans shouldn’t expect much from the falling inflation, as the drop only means the rate at which prices of goods are rising has relaxed. “The loss of value of money has already occurred and Ugandans should not expect much unless there are salary adjustments or increased incomes” Mr Mutesasira said.
Inflation is the general change in the prices of commodities and services over a certain period of time. Dr Patrick Wakida, an economist said what the economy is experiencing is monetary inflation easing down due to the tight monetary policy stance that has sucked money out of the public but Ugandans shouldn’t expect any change or improvement in the cost of living. “The current figures wont impact the ordinary man because it’s monetary inflation that is coming down. The performance of the economy has not improved and the cost of borrowing is still high” he said.
The Consumer Price Index, the official measure of inflation, released by the Uganda Bureau of Statistics (Ubos) yesterday shows inflation eased by one percentage point to 4.5 per cent in October from a revised rate of 5.5 per cent in September.
However, Dr Chris Ndatira Mukiza, the director, macroeconomic statistics at Ubos said while releasing the figures that despite the fall in inflation, Ugandans shouldn’t expect a corresponding fall in commodity prices because the current positive digit inflation only means that the rate at which commodity prices are increasing as has slowed compared to the same period last year. Commodity prices, according to Dr Mukiza, can only come down if inflation falls to negatives.
Inflation has been on a downward trend month-on-month since November 2011, from the high of 30.4 per cent that was witnessed in October 2011, driven by a tight monetary policy stance and increased food supplies to markets.
The reduction in the October inflation has been attributed to the tight monetary policy stance pursued by Bank of Uganda recently that has contracted growth in private sector credit and increased food supplies to markets. Although BoU has in the recent past been easing the CBR to 13 per cent in October from 23 per cent in October 2011, its impact is yet to be felt as commercial banks’ lending rates remain high. “Interest rates are still high and people are not borrowing, neither are they investing as much as they used to when the cost of borrowing was still affordable” Mr Mutesasira said.
However, players in the banking industry have always attributed the sticky fall in lending rates and their failure to match the CBR cut to tough market conditions characterised by low deposits, in sufficient liquidity in the market and that most banks were still financing expensive loans.
fonte www.monitor.co.ug Faridah Kulabako

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HOW DISTRICTS ARE FEEDING THEIR PUPILS
5 november 2012
Studying on an empty stomach is the hardest experience any school going child should not go through. But hundreds of thousands of them, especially those under the free education programme live with this problem –which has adversely affected their concentration in class and consequently their academic performance.
To reverse this trend, some districts have come up with by-laws compelling parents to contribute some little money to cater for their children’s lunch and one of them is Tororo district. But this seems to contravene a presidential directive banning the practice in all primary schools implementing the free education programme.
President Museveni has on numerous occasions warned school heads against charging extra fees to provide lunch at school – insisting that pupils have to carry packed food since government pays for their fees. Mr Museveni maintains that the practice undermines the free education government programme because it increases school dropout since many parents cannot afford the extra charges. But Mr Emmanuel Osuna, the Tororo District chairman says they have built consensus with parents in the area and are ready to support the initiative.
The same applies to Mpigi where parents are willing to pay Shs500 for their children’s feeding, according to the district chairman John Luwakanya. “The president is not against the idea of giving pupils lunch at school but is simply unhappy with some head teachers who turn it into a money minting venture.” says Mr Osuna.
The presidential directive issued three years ago followed numerous complaints from parents accusing head teachers of demanding extra fees and when they fail to comply their children are chased from school. But Mr Osuna says parents are required to provide 6kgs of maize seeds and Shs 1000 for processing maize flour, paying the cook and firewood. “We are not preventing any child from accessing the classroom but we want to ensure that parents do something for the well- being of their children at school” he says.
Mr Osuna says free education as stated does not mean that parents stop playing their roles as parents. “It is indeed our responsibility as local leaders and other stake holders to help government in sensitising parents about the components of free education” he says.
However, he says some unscrupulous head teachers in Nabuyoga sub country had started sabotaging the project by selling maize seeds provided by the parents.“We have already identified them and the long hand of the law is going to find them” he adds.
State Minister for Primary Education Dr Kamanda Bataringaya says the ministry has no problem with parents agreeing with schools to feed their children. “The contest has always been on contributing cash but if parents agree to provide real food, that is a good step and we shall support it” he says.
A parliamentary sectoral committee on education recently recommended to government to compel local governments create enforce by-laws which require parents to provide meals for their children.
According to Section 5(2) of Education Act 2008, parents have a duty of feeding their children at school. The committee noted that lack of a clear feeding programme in UPE schools had negatively impacted on the scheme, causing massive drop-outs and absenteeism. This corroborates with figures from Mpigi District where dropout rates stand at 65 percent for boys and 59 percent for girls’ . Only 35 percent of boys in the district complete Primary Seven while girls are 41 percent.
Education minister Jessica Alupo says Cabinet had already approved three ways through which pupils will be helped get lunch at school. These include; allowing parents in urban areas to pay cash for meals to a sum agreed by school management, board of governors and the parent’s teacher associations.
For parents in rural areas, according to Ms Alupo cabinet recommended that contributions be made in kind.

fonte www.monitor.co.ug Al-Amahdi Ssenkabirwa

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THEMATIC CURRICULUM: SCHOOLS STILL GRAPPLING
5 november 2012
John Mutebi, 13, is a primary seven pupil in one of the prominent city primary schools where he has been since baby class. He is among thousands of pupils who joined Primary One at a time the thematic curriculum was rolled out seven years ago.
But even as the curriculum programme promoted the use of local languages in lower primary (P1 to P3), he was never introduced to his mother tongue –Luganda as the government policy suggests. At his home, his older siblings and parents use English language making it hard for him to learn his mother language.

But why did government review the curriculum and how much has this been achieved? According to National Curriculum Development Centre, there was an emergency after research findings done by the Ministry of Education, Uganda National Examinations Board and the evaluation department under the NCDC indicated that children were reaching P7 without knowing how to read and write.
The concern of low literacy and numeracy skills was first raised by parents and education officials. It was also evident in how pupils answered Uneb questions and how they interacted with the community. It doesn’t surprise me if university lecturers complain about their students’ performance” says Mr Gabriel Obbo Katandi, the coordinator for Upper Primary at Uneb.
Mr Katandi told Education Guide in an earlier interview that the thematic curriculum was introduced to address the literacy and numeracy weaknesses, the overcrowded curriculum and the promotion of life skills among children. However, Mutebi’s experience shows how the thematic concept has failed to take off in many schools especially in urban centres where teachers emphasise English as a medium of communication.
According to Mr Chrysostom Kibeti, Uneb deputy secretary primary exams, he acknowledges that many schools have not followed the concept but is quickly on the defensive saying teaching in local languages can only be possible in rural areas. He added that this year’s national exams will have the concept to see how much of the literacy and numeracy competences have been attained.
For instance, he said that candidates siting PLE will find Mathematics section A has changed from 30 questions to 20 with each taking two marks while English language will emphasise skills.
Questions in Social Studies or Religious Education have increased to promote the moral aspect. “The thematic curriculum was misunderstood. The schools were expected to teach in a language commonly used in the locality. But this is possible in rural areas. In urban centres, the schools can use English as a medium of instruction” Mr Kibeti explained. The resistance has come mostly from private schools who claim teaching in local languages wastes their time because it is not examined at the end.
The ministry did little to sensitise the public about the curriculum which caused a lot of criticism from both the parents and teachers. “Many private primary schools forget that their institutions are not a subsection of secondary schools where any teacher can teach. Being a graduate or professor doesn’t mean that you have the competencies to handle a primary two class. They employ less and over qualified people with some lacking pedagogical skills” says Ms Deborah Magera, NCDC head of the early childhood department.
Ms Geraldine Bukenya, a curriculum specialist on local languages at NCDC blames this on government which allowed schools in urban centres to use English as a medium of instruction right from the beginning. “There was a loophole right from the start. You cannot say village schools should adopt a local language to use but city schools are free to continue using English. It is like saying pupils should put on uniform but those who cannot afford can dress in any way they feel like” she noted.
According to Bukenya, teachers in lower primary were also supposed to be posted to schools in localities whose languages they can ably speak and write but this is not followed at all. “This was a requirement at the start of this programme but unfortunately, along the way district service commissions reverted to the old arrangement of simply posting teachers to areas where they think there is shortage. And some teachers who had been trained in thematic curriculum are transferred without making consultations with school management committees leaving a gap in many schools” she says. “We had indeed equipped those teachers with skills to enable them adopt themes related to children’s experiences to increase interest in learning the different subjects they will study in later years but all that seem to have gone to waste” she adds.
Government was also supposed to set up a National Language Advisory Board and district language boards but these are yet to be established. “We submitted our proposals several years ago on how we want the advisory board to look like and we hope they (ministry of education) are yet to consider them but on the local language board we are yet to complete the process and we plan to create 27 of them” she said.
However, Ms Magera says pupils whose schools followed the thematic curriculum have had their proficiency in reading and writing improved. “We have done three assessments in schools where the curriculum was embraced, results are promising. What is lacking is the element of identifying the gaps and we address them. Teachers need to be retooled and all this requires more funding to the sector” she said.
In 2008, the commissioner basic education Dr Daniel Nkaada threatened to close schools that don’t follow the curriculum and this simply ended as a mere threat. “Changes usually take long to be grasped by our people and our work is to continue sensitizing them” said Dr Nkaada on telephone last week.
He admitted that many teachers are still facing huddles in finding learning materials in some languages like Luo which he blamed on limited resources. “It is true we have not been able to provide all the required materials and the budget has been a big factor in this. As soon as we get the money, all that will be addressed” he added.
According to the 2012 Education Sector Annual Performance report out of the 455 teachers in schools visited, only half (51 percent) are trained on the thematic curriculum.
fonte www.monitor.co.ug Al-Amahdi Ssenkabirwa and Patience Ahimbisibwe

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CORRUZIONE: AIUTI ESTERI SOTTRATTI, GOVERNO NELLA BUFERA
6 novembre 2012
Il governo di Kampala si è impegnato a restituire all’Irlanda quattro milioni di euro sottratti da funzionari dell’ufficio del primo ministro e originariamente destinati a progetti di sviluppo nelle regioni del nord e della Karamoja.
La vicenda – l’ennesimo e plateale caso di corruzione in seno alle più alte istituzioni ugandesi – risale alle scorse settimane, quando il governo di Dublino ha chiesto conto degli aiuti versati per la ricostruzione delle regioni settentrionali del paese africano.

l primo ministro Amama Mbabazi ha assicurato davanti alle telecamere delle principali emittenti nazionali, di non aver mai avuto notizia dei versamenti e accusato alcuni dei suoi funzionari di aver dirottato le somme su conti privati.
Lo scandalo, che ha ricevuto ampia eco sulla stampa irlandese, ha portato all’arresto di due funzionari della presidenza del consiglio e ad un’inchiesta che coinvolge, in tutto, altre 17 persone.
L’Irlanda, dal canto suo, ha sospeso il versamento dei 16 milioni di euro di aiuti già stanziati per finanziare progetti di sviluppo nel nord dell’Uganda
– regione martoriata dalla guerriglia dell’Esercito di Resistenza del Signore (Lra) – in attesa dello svolgimento dei processi.
Stessa decisione – riferisce oggi il quotidiano ‘The Monitor’ – hanno preso i governi di Svezia, Norvegia, Danimarca e Gran Bretagna mentre il segretario permanente dell’ufficio del primo ministro Pius Bigirimana è ancora in carica nonostante un provvedimento approvato dal parlamento la scorsa settimana prevedesse la sua immediata rimozione.
fonte www.misna.org

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UPE: STAGGERING 71% DROP-OUT RATE SO FAR
10 november 2012
This indicates a whopping 71% drop-out rate, much higher than the 40% usually quoted. According to statistics from the Ministry Of Education, 1,598,636 pupils enrolled for Primary one in government-aided schools in 2006. But the Uganda National Examinations Board (UNEB) figures for pupils who sat Primary Leaving Examinations (PLE) this week are 463,332, which is only 29% of those who enrolled in 2006.
So, what happened to the 71%? Did they all drop-out, die or could it be evidence of the alleged existence of ghost pupils in UPE? The commissioner of primary education, Dr. Daniel Nkaada, says a scientific research is needed to find out what happens to the enrolled pupils.
Could they be ghost?
A report by the Judicial Service Commission instituted by President Yoweri Museveni to probe fraud in UPE and USE confirmed existence of ghosts in schools. The commission compared the official enrollment given by the school administrators, with the headcount results and found a variance of about 21.6%.
The report also estimates that the Government lost about sh400b under UPE and USE last year alone, due to shoddy construction works and absenteeism among pupils, teachers and head teachers.
Nkaada notes “The issue of ghost pupils is real. But you cannot confirm it until you have probed it.” He blames head teachers and local governments for the ghosts saying they are the ones directly responsible for recording enrollment. He adds that the ministry of education is fighting ghosts through conducting routine head counts of UPE and USE students. The finance ministry revealed last year that the Government loses sh28b annually to ghost teachers, pupils and schools.
Did they drop out?
UPE is credited for increasing enrollment. If indeed threefold drop out before P.7, this important programme will come to naught. In East Africa, Uganda has the lowest proportion of children staying in school up to P7, according to a 2010 report by the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO). In Kenya, the completion rate is 84%, Tanzania 81% and Rwanda 74%. Moses Kyambadde, the head teacher of Natyole Primary School in Luweero district said: “After 15 years of UPE, Uganda should have achieved a significant increase in literacy levels. But this seems not the case because most children drop out before they even learn how to read and write.”
Early pregnancies
The health ministry’s HIV/AIDS report of 2011 showed that children are exposed to sex very early. About 71% of teenagers have risky sex, yet, according to the report, less than half use condoms. The earlier 2006 Uganda demographic and Health Survey (UDHS), put the teenage pregnancy rate at 25%. Data from the education ministry shows that dropouts are highest among girls than boys due to early pregnancies.
How expensive is UPE? Critics also attribute the high school drop-out in Uganda to the hidden cost of universal education on the parents. Under UPE, parents still have to contribute towards school meals, scholastic materials and uniforms. Many children from poor families may find it hard to complete the seven-year cycle.
James Male Kiwalabye, the programme manager at the Uganda NGO Forum, cite overcrowding in classrooms poor conditions at schools as the other factors fueling high drop-outs rates. “I studied at St. Tereza primary school in Mitala-Maria, Mpigi in the early 1990s, we were 40 in class. Today, the same classroom accommodates over 150 pupils.”
fonte www.newvision.co.ug Francis Kagolo

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AFRICA, LA GRAVIDANZA E IL PARTO MIETONO 200 MILA VITTIME L’ANNO
14 novembre 2012
Nell’ambito delle iniziative sul Premio Sakharov 2012, organizzate dal Parlamento Europeo, tra il 12 ed il 16 novembre, e della settimana di incontri intitolata ‘L’Europa è per i Diritti Umani’, AMREF rilancia i temi nella campagna globale ‘Stand Up For African Mothers’, dedicando un seminario al diritto alla salute delle donne africane, in particolare nel percorso che accompagna la loro maternità.
I rischi di diventare mammaLa gravidanza e il parto sono i più grandi rischi per la vita delle adolescenti e delle donne in Africa: ogni anno ne muoiono più di 200.000 per mancanza di cure di base. A stroncare tante vite, e a creare più di 1 milione di orfani ogni anno, sono complicanze il più delle volte prevenibili o curabili in presenza di un’adeguata assistenza.
Basti pensare che una donna ogni 16 in Africa rischia di morire nel dare la vita, mentre in Europa, grazie alle cure prenatali e all’assistenza al parto, il rischio riguarda una donna ogni 30.000.

La campagna ha un obiettivo semplice e perseguibile: formare 15.000 ostetriche in Africa entro il 2015 e contribuire alla riduzione della mortalità materna in Africa del 25%, contribuendo in modo determinante al perseguimento dell’Obiettivo 5 di Sviluppo del Millennio. Una volta formata, ogni ostetrica può assistere 500 donne ogni anno e far nascere in condizioni di sicurezza centinaia di bambini.
La priorità – La salute materno-infantile è una priorità per AMREF, che lavora da 55 anni per creare sviluppo e generare cambiamenti duraturi nelle condizioni di salute e di vita delle comunità più remote dell’Africa Sub-Sahariana.
Per il diritto alla salute di donne e bambini, AMREF sviluppa programmi che comprendono la formazione di personale sanitario, l’accesso ai servizi medici di base, l’educazione su salute riproduttiva e pratiche igienico-sanitarie, l’accesso a fonti d’acqua pulita e a servizi igienici sicuri.
I testimonial
“Sono entusiasta di far parte di questa importante iniziativa, che contribuisce all’Obiettivo del Millennio ONU di ridurre la mortalità materna in Africa. Di tutti gli obiettivi, questo è quello su cui siamo più vergognosamente in ritardo” dice l’ambasciatrice mondiale della Campagna, Graça Machel Mandela.
fonte www.repubblica.it

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BREVI DALL’AFRICA
15 novembre 2012
Una nuova epidemia di Ebola, che ha già causato due vittime, è stata dichiarata ad appena un mese dalla fine dell’ultimo focolaio che, nell’ovest del paese, aveva provocato 17 morti.
Lo ha reso noto il ministro della Sanità Christine Ondoa secondo cui l’epicentro sarebbe una cinquantina di chilometri a nord di Kampala.
È
qui che due membri di un stessa famiglia sono deceduti tra sabato e lunedì e le analisi effettuate sui resti hanno confermato il caso di febbre emorragica. Cinque persone entrate in contatto con le vittime sono state messe in quarantena e sono attualmente sotto osservazione di un’equipe di medici dell’ospedale Mulago, della capitale. Un terzo uomo era deceduto a ottobre dopo aver presentato sintomi riconducibili all’Ebola – riferisce la stampa – ma il suo caso non era stato segnalato alle autorità e su di lui non sono state effettuate le analisi necessarie.
Non esiste alcun trattamento specifico all’Ebola, virus manifestatosi per la prima volta nel 1976 nell’allora Zaire e che si ripresenta ciclicamente in diversi paesi dell’Africa centrale, tra cui Uganda, Kenya, Rwanda e Tanzania.
L’epidemia più letale risale al 2000, quando 225 persone persero la vita. L’Ebola, che sfocia in una grave febbre emorragica con un indice di mortalità fino al 90%, si trasmette attraverso il contatto diretto con persone infette.

fonte www.misna.org

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UGANDA CLOSES BORDER WITH DR CONGO
15 november 2012
Sources told Kampala’s Daily Monitor newspaper Tuesday that trucks heading to DR Congo were stopped by the Ugandan military to deny M23 rebels revenue collection.
The Army spokesperson, Col Felix Kulayigye, confirmed the incident, saying the border was closed on the orders of President Yoweri Museveni, who is on a three-day visit to Sri Lanka. “It’s true we have temporarily closed the border at the request of the Kinshasa government because the M23 rebels had started collecting money from the trucks carrying goods from Uganda to DR Congo” he said.
This abrupt closure will see Uganda lose hundreds of millions of dollars through trade with eastern DR Congo. Many Ugandan traders export goods like sugar, soap, cooking oil and fresh food to DR Congo through the Bunagana post. The closure followed a Monday meeting between Uganda’s State minister for Foreign Affairs Okello Oryem and a Congolese delegation in Kampala. Mr Oryem couldn’t answer the Monitor’s repeated calls, but Col. Kulayigye said he was not sure when the border would be reopened. “I can’t guess, but it’s a short term measure” he said.
With the closure of the border, the M23 rebels controlling the areas of Bunagana, Rutshuru and other areas in eastern DR Congo since April will be denied revenue which they were using to fund their activities. A report by the UN group of experts has accused Uganda and Rwanda of supporting M23 rebels, allegations that sparked angry reactions from Kampala and Kigali.
The M23 movement says they rebelled because the government failed to comply with a peace agreement signed in March 2009. A new report to be released on Monday next week by World Wildlife Fund for Nature says that 50 per cent of timber imports from DR Congo to Uganda through Bunagana and other posts are underpaid in taxes.
fonte www.afronline.org Risdel Kasasira

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PARCO DI BWINDI, AUMENTANO I GORILLA DI MONTAGNA
15 novembre 2012
E’ aumentato in Uganda il numero dei gorilla di montagna, passati dai 302 del 2006 a circa 400. Lo rivela un censimento condotto nel 2011 e i cui dati sono stati rivelati in questi giorni.
L’Uganda è ora il principale paese ad ospitare i gorilla su una popolazione totale che per l’Africa è stimata in circa 880 individui: il resto della popolazione vive in Congo e Rwanda. In Uganda i gorilla vivono nel Parco nazionale impenetrabile di Bwindi, nel sud-ovest del paese.

Il loro aumento – viene riferito in una nota del ministero del Turismo ugandese – conferma il buon risultato nella gestione delle risorse naturali presenti nelle aree protette”.
Il Parco di Bwindi si estende per un totale di 331 chilometri quadrati, in un’area caratterizzata da foresta tropicale e aree montuose. Si trova al confine con la Repubblica democratica del Congo ed è adiacente al Parco nazionale dei vulcani Virunga, l’area congolese destinata ai gorilla che è stata negli anni scorsi luogo di rifugio di gruppi armati, responsabili di violenze e di atti di bracconaggio.
fonte www.misna.org

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EBOLA DEATHS AT FIVE AS 40 ARE MONITORED
19 november 2012
One more person succumbed to the Ebola virus yesterday, bringing the death toll in the latest outbreak of the dreaded haemorrhagic fever in the country to five. The victim, a 29-year-old woman, died at Bombo Hospital, some 30 kilometres north of Kampala, where she was admitted on Tuesday last week. Halima Nakimbugwe is said to have contracted the disease while nursing her husband, a boda boda rider, who was the first person to die in the latest epidemic in Luweero District.
Ministry of Health spokesperson Rukia Nakamatte, said Nakimbugwe died yesterday afternoon at Bombo Hospital, where results of the tests carried out confirmed that she had contracted Ebola.
Two other people confirmed to have been infected with the virus have been admitted to Mulago Hospital. Another 12 suspected to have been infected with the virus are also admitted to Mulago, while another six are at Bombo Hospital.

“The number of confirmed Ebola patients remains the two admitted to Mulago Hospital, while the number of contacts has risen from 34 to 40. These are being monitored both in Kampala and Bombo
” Ms Nakamatte said.
Another suspect, this time from Mbarara, was also admitted to Mulago yesterday after he presented signs of the Ebola fever. His blood samples have been taken for tests and results are expected soon. In Luweero, a burial team set up by the District Ebola Task Force to ensure that bodies of those confirmed or suspected to have Ebola are handled and buried by a special team, yesterday narrowly escaping lynching by mourners who snatched a body from the Nakatonya Muslim Cemetery in Bombo Town Council.
According the Luweero District disease surveillance officer, Mr Richard Kawenyera, the mourners armed with clubs, sticks and stones accused the special burial team of violating Muslim burial rites by wrapping the dead body in a bag. They insisted on washing the body before burial as part of the Islamic rites. “We are worried because we do not know what happened afterwards. The blood sample was taken to the Uganda Virus Research Institute and the results had not been received to confirm whether or not he died of Ebola. If a positive result turns up, these people will have touched the body of an Ebola victim” Mr Kawenyera said on Saturday.
The Luweero District Health Officer, Dr Joseph Okware, said the man’s body had been taken to the Nyimbwa Health Centre IV by relatives, after he was found dead in a store at Ndejje University on Friday. “They wanted us to ascertain the cause of death since he is a resident of Kakute Village in Nyimbwa Sub-county, where there has been an Ebola outbreak. We handled the case carefully until we got information that the mourners had grabbed the body from our team.
A special isolation centre for both the suspected and confirmed cases is being set up with the support from the Medecines Sans Frotiers, at Nyimbwa Health Centre IV, where patients are expected to be transferred to from Bombo Military Hospital on Monday (today).
In Nakasongola District, traditional healers have been banned from admitting patients whom they do not know following the Ebola outbreak which has claimed two lives in the neighbouring Luweero District.
This follows reports that an Ebola patient from Luweero may have been rushed to one of the traditional medicine men’s shrines in Nakasongola before she died. This has sparked off panic among local residents.
fonte
www.monitor.co.ug Agatha Ayebazibwe, Dan Wandera and Samuel Kaweesa

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ENTRO IL 2025 UN BAMBINO SU TRE SARÀ AFRICANO
20 novembre 2012
Entro il 2025 la popolazione mondiale arriverà a 8 miliardi (la soglia dei 7 era stata superata poco più di un anno fa) Il nuovo miliardo sarà composto di bambini, il 90% dei quali nato nelle regioni meno sviluppate del pianeta. Di più: una persona ogni tre fra quelle che nasceranno nel 2025 sarà africana.
Nel 1925 questo rapporto era di 1 a dieci. E ancora: per quanto India e Cina continueranno ad avere una quota significativa della popolazione mondiale, sarà la Nigeria il paese ad avere il maggiore incremento in assoluto della propria popolazione inferiore ai 18 anni, con ben 31 milioni di bambini in più e un incremento del 41% tra il 2010 e il 2025. Ma sempre in Nigeria avverrà un decesso su otto tra quelli che a livello mondiale si registreranno tra i minori di 18 anni.
Le proiezioni – Queste proiezioni sono contenute nella ricerca ‘Generazione 2025 e oltre’, curata da Danzhen You e David Anhony e pubblicata in occasione della ‘Giornata mondiale dell’infanzia’, che si celebra in tutto il mondo il 20 novembre, anniversario della firma della Convenzione Onu sui diritti dei bambini.
Numeri che prefigurano uno scenario mondiale particolarmente preoccupante, sia perché saranno le nazioni del Sud del mondo, quelle con le maggiori difficoltà economiche e sociali, a registrare gli incrementi maggiori (solo gli Stati Uniti, tra quelli che faranno segnare una crescita della percentuale di bambini tra la propria popolazione, rappresenteranno i Paesi più ricchi), sia perché si porrà il problema di come organizzare le risorse in società che tendono ad un sempre maggiore invecchiamento.
Generazioni contro
– La crescita della vita media, fanno notare all’Unicef, “aumenterà la pressione per destinare le risorse alle fasce che non comprendono i bambini“. “I bambini – sottolinea Danzhen You – non votano e le loro voci non vengono ascoltate quando i governi devono prendere decisioni sui finanziamenti“.
Sono cambiamenti fondamentali e senza precedenti – aggiunge David Anthony – ed è importante come il mondo si preparerà ad affrontare l’agenda post-2015. Dobbiamo fare tutto il possibile perché questi bambini abbiano ogni possibilità di sopravvivere, svilupparsi e raggiungere il loro pieno potenziale.”
fonte www.corriere.it

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UGANDA, 8.900 FAMIGLIE GRAVEMENTE DANNEGGIATE DALLE INONDAZIONI
22 novembre 2012
Nel corso di quest’anno in Uganda c’è stato un avvicendarsi di disastri e situazioni di emergenza come conflitti tribali, di frontiera, lotte per il territorio, spostamenti di popolazione da altri paesi, incendi boschivi, di scuole, grandinate, frane, epidemie di colera, ebola e morbo di Marburg, oltre a focolai di altre malattie.
A tutte queste tragedie si aggiungono un totale di 34.372 persone, 8.903 famiglie, che sono state colpite da alluvioni e smottamenti di acqua in diverse parti del Paese.
Da gennaio 2012 le tante emergenze hanno afflitto 192.094 persone. I distretti andati distrutti sono quello di Soroti, Amuria, Katakwi, Nakapiripirit, Kween, Tororo, Kapchorwa, Lira, Ntoroko, Moroto, Nebbi, Kibale e Kotido. Otuke, che si trova in quello di Lira, è il più danneggiato, con 6.225 persone coinvolte.
Dal mese di marzo inoltre le inondazioni hanno devastato l’Uganda in diverse zone, come Amuria, Katakwi, Nakapiripirit, Kween.
fonte www.fides.org

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UGANDA: BEWARE, AIDS STILL KILLS!
29 november 2012
Tomorrow is World Aids Day and in Uganda official ceremonies to commemorate the event will take place at Kasensero landing site in Kakuuto county, Rakai district. Perhaps it is just as well that this event goes to the place where, in 1982, the first HIV/Aids cases in Uganda were identified.
The choice of venue should help remind us that Aids still exists and still kills, a fact that appears lost on many Ugandans. This year’s theme is ‘Re-engaging leadership for effective HIV prevention’. The theme was obviously tailored to take note of the frustrating fact that HIV, which Uganda almost dealt a deadly blow in the late 1990s and early 2000s, is showing signs of rebounding.
The Uganda Aids Commission Director, Dr David Kihumuro Apuuli, was recently quoted as lamenting that the scourge is still growing. We must not lose the fight. Many reasons have been advanced for the reversal of earlier gains, including the introduction of anti-retroviral therapy (ART), which has reduced the fear factor about HIV/Aids.
However, ARVs are not a cure. They are very expensive. They are not a sustainable solution. Besides, they have side effects that can make life quite uncomfortable and are meant to be treatment for life. The only viable and sustainable solution lies in zero infections or prevention. The means might vary but the end is the same.
Whether it is through Abstinence, Being faithful or using Condoms, what is most important is that we stop the spread of HIV. Thus in keeping with this year’s theme, it is imperative that the government, NGOs, religious and cultural leaders, as well as individuals, rededicate themselves to the fight against this killer disease.
For those already infected, we urge the government and donors to make ARVs readily available and accessible. At the moment, only a fraction of those who need them actually access them. Yet it has been shown that when people start on ARVs early enough and stick to them, they have little chance of transmitting the virus to others.
But then we must know our status first. Let’s begin by testing, for experience has shown that a stitch in time saves nine.

fonte www.allafrica.com

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Cambio valuta: in data 30/11/2012 1 dollaro USA è pari a 2681 scellini ugandesi, 1 Euro è pari a 3484,2798 scellini ugandesi.


UgandAbout è un servizio dell’Associazione Italia Uganda Onlus a cura di Simona Meneghelli

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