2015

30.09

UgandAbout

Ugandabout – settembre 2015

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Alcune notizie sull’Uganda e sull’Africa recuperate da internet nel settembre 2015.

FAO E UNDP AIUTANO OTTO PAESI AD AFFRONTARE IL CAMBIAMENTO CLIMATICO
1 settembre 2015

WHY TYPHOID IS STILL A PROBLEM IN KAMPALA
3 september 2015

PARENTS TO FEEL THE PINCH AS TERM THREE OPENS
7 september 2015

POPE’S VISIT SET TO USHER NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR PILGRIMAGE TOURISM
7 september 2015

UPTAKE OF EAST AFRICA’S SINGLE TOURIST VISA INCREASES
8 september 2015

ONU: MORTALITÀ BIMBI DIMEZZATA IN 25 ANNI, OBIETTIVO ERA 75%
9 settembre 2015

KENYA, UGANDA E CENTRAFRICA: A NOVEMBRE IL VIAGGIO DI PAPA FRANCESCO
10 settembre 2015

MALARIA DEATHS ‘FALL 60% SINCE 2000′
17 settembre 2015

LOTTA ALLA MALARIA: DUE STUDI CONFERMANO PROGRESSI
17 settembre 2015

UGANDAN ECONOMY TO GROW BY UP TO 5.5 PERCENT
19 september 2015

PRESIDENZIALI, MUSEVENI SI CANDIDA ANCORA
21 settembre 2015

MEDICS EXCITED BY REVOLUTIONARY NEWBORN TREATMENT
23 dicembre 2015

ACCORDO INTERNAZIONALE PER IL PARCO DEL VIRUNGA
24 settembre 2015

ONE IN EVERY THREE PEOPLE IS MALNOURISHED
26 september 2015


FAO E UNDP AIUTANO OTTO PAESI AD AFFRONTARE IL CAMBIAMENTO CLIMATICO
1 settembre 2015
Aiutare otto Paesi in via di sviluppo a rafforzare le loro risposte di adattamento al cambiamento climatico: Nepal, Kenya, Filippine, Thailandia, Uganda, Uruguay, Vietnam e Zambia. È questo l’ultimo progetto delle Nazioni unite, finanziato dalla Germania, l’Integrating Agriculture in National Adaptation Plans Programme (Integrare l’agricoltura nel programma di adattamento ai piani nazionali).
La Fao e il Programma delle Nazioni unite per lo sviluppo lavoreranno assieme ai ministeri di vari settori – soprattutto Ambiente e Agricoltura – per aiutare i Paesi a migliorare la propria pianificazione agricola e il bilancio nel medio e lungo periodo. L’obiettivo è integrare il settore agricolo nei Piani di adattamento nazionali così da salvaguardare la sussistenza, incrementare la produzione agricola e promuovere la sicurezza alimentare.
L’iniziativa durerà quattro anni, durante i quali i Paesi riceveranno vari tipi di assistenza: consulenze, aiuto nella gestione del rischio climatico, nella pianificazione, sostegno per il coordinamento tra le istituzioni governative. “La nostra sicurezza alimentare nei decenni a venire dipende dalla nostra capacità collettiva di innovare e di adattarsi al cambiamento climatico – ha dichiarato Adriana Dinu, coordinatrice esecutiva della Global Environment Finance Unit dell’Undp – il settore agricolo è fondamentale per ogni nazione ed è un’ancora di salvezza per i mezzi di sussistenza.”
Per ciascuno degli otto Paesi è stato studiato un programma su misura in base alle diverse esigenze. In Nepal è necessario aumentare le varietà di colture resistenti alla siccità; in Uganda urge l’istituzione di un sistema di allarme per rischi climatici; nelle Filippine c’è molta insicurezza alimentare e bisogna trovare un modo di difendere al meglio le comunità agricole; in Uruguay si intende ripristinare i pascoli degradati e gli ecosistemi costieri a rischio.
Tre quarti dei poveri del mondo vive in aree rurali e dipende dall’agricoltura per la propria sussistenza. I Paesi in via di sviluppo saranno quelli la cui agricoltura soffrirà di più le conseguenze del cambiamento climatico. Da qui l’importanza dei Piani di adattamento nazionali, che aiuteranno preventivamente a programmare come ridurre al minimo il potenziale calo dei rendimenti dovuto a raccolti irregolari.
fonte www.liberoquotidiano.it

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WHY TYPHOID IS STILL A PROBLEM IN KAMPALA
3 september 2015

A walk to downtown areas of Kampala city, which were worst hit by the typhoid outbreak a few months ago shows some lessons have not been learned – yet. Food vendors still sell bottled water and beverages which were found to be the source of the problem.
One Ssali, who believes he contracted typhoid after eating mangoes, says that the illness forced him to stop working for about three weeks since he had to drink a lot of water and fluids from home, which was not available at the office.
“I went back for checkup after the treatment and the doctor found me negative. However, I suspect the mangoes I took caused me problems. I like eating the green cover” he says.
The typhoid outbreak that hit Kampala and its neighbouring districts of Mukono and Wakiso for about four months was confirmed by the Ministry of Health and Kampala Capital City Authority (KCCA) in February this year.
The director general of health services, Dr Ruth Aceng, then noted the confirmation was after investigations into reports initially of a strange diseases among individuals working at Qualicel, Nabukeera Plaza, and Total Petrol Station in Nakivubo. The strange illness at the time, which killed two people, was later confirmed as typhoid.
Dr Monica Musenero, the assistant commissioner in-charge of epidemiology and epidemic diseases, said investigations had revealed that people were affected through eating or drinking things that were contaminated at their work stations.
Efforts were made to deal with the disease and finally in June, Dr Aceng announced an end to the outbreak, reporting that a total of 14,304 suspected cases were received. Of these, 10,230 met the case definition for typhoid and were treated in the six designated treatment centres in Kampala’s divisions. However, she said, a total number of confirmed cases stood at 1,090 cases out of which 52 cases were confirmed by blood culture and 1,038 by Tubex.
Dr Willington Amutuhaire, the supervisor epidemiology and disease control in the health department at KCCA explained that the human and environment samples collected and investigated in February confirmed presence of pathogens which cause typhoid.
“We collected samples of water and other beverages from the areas, which were hard hit by the outbreak. For water and food, we were looking for contamination but for environmental samples we were looking for faecal matter” said Dr Amutuhaire who was the lead supervisor of the health facilities demarcated as insolation treatment centres.
According to Dr Amutuhaire, January and February are dry seasons and the level of water in the springs, wells and channels goes down. This leads to increased concentration of typhoid-causing bacterium known as Salmonella Typhi.
“Due to the lack of water, people are forced to drink water containing typhoid pathogens thus the emergency of the problem” he added. However, he was quick to state that the absence of water does not take away the challenge of poor personal hygiene and sanitation in Kampala, and this is one of the reasons the typhoid problem has not been completely erased.
A study conducted and released by the Ministry of Health this year, titled, ‘The National Burden Food Borne diseases Pilot Study Report’ indicated a rise in the number of patients diagnosed with food borne diseases due to sanitation failures, consumption of contaminated water, chemical residues and other contaminants in food.
Another study conducted by scientists from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and KCCA officials during the typhoid outbreak indicated high levels of faecal contamination in springs or wells, and in some brands of bottled water.
Citing the root cause of poor hygiene and sanitation which is absence of water, Dr Amutuhaire says the water supply that is clear of those pathogens, from NWSC, is still limited to a few households and the toilet coverage is also a nightmare in Kampala as ‘flying toilets’ are still an alternative for some people.
Dr Amutuhaire also blames the disease outbreak in Kampala to lack of strong disease surveillance systems and limited funds.
“In the first place, if we had a strong surveillance system this would not have happened” said Dr Amutuhaire.
Dr Charles Okot, an adviser with World Health Organisation (WHO) on Disease Surveillance and Response also emphasised the need for early detection of the disease and encouraged proper sanitation to prevent typhoid.
According to the health expert, behavioural change is needed among majority Ugandans but also the other regulatory bodies including Uganda National Bureau of Standards and National Water and sewerage Corporation, should play their part.
At Kisenyi Health Centre IV, which was designated as typhoid screening and treatment centre during the outbreak, Mr Ronald Lubega, a nursing officer who heads the Out-Patient department (OPD) said the situation has since normalised ever since the ministry declared an end to the outbreak.
“After following up all the cases, in a week, we currently receive and diagnose about two people with typhoid fever” said Mr Lubega. He added that most of the typhoid patients who were treated those days come from Nansana and Makindye divisions.
“We provide information on how to avoid typhoid by advising all our patients to boil drinking water, promote personal cleanliness and avoid eating dirty fruits and also eating from dirty places” said Mr Lubega. Although work has been done to deal with the outbreak, typhoid remains a problem and more needs to be done.
Causes Typhoid fever, water borne disease, is associated with fever caused by bacteria from a group called salmonella. In humans it’s caused by Salmonella typhi.
Symptoms include: fever and abdominal pain, cough, joint pains, general malaise and dizziness.
Most cases during the outbreak were identified among people working around Nakasero Market, Disableds’ Maket, New Taxi Park, Allen Road, Nabukeera Plaza, Qualicel and Total petrol station on Namirembe Road. However, most of the affected people reside in Kibuli, Namungoona, Lugoba, Kanyogaga, Bulenga and Natete, all Kampala suburbs and some from Wakiso.
Big restaurants, hotels also culprits – On addressing the disease burden, Amutuhaire noted that food safety and hygiene in Uganda is still a big challenge given that even the so called big and famous food restaurants and hotels have been found lacking.
“You have seen us close famous eateries, supermarkets and food houses with rotten kitchen areas” he says. Amutuhaire adds that the business community has a role to play in fighting this food borne disease because most of the restaurants are owned by ordinary people.
“The contaminated beverages are still on the market but as the KCCA health department, we are doing everything possible to stop the unhygienic businesses but the media has to supplement us on social mobilisation both on the supply and demand side” he added.
fonte www.allafrica.com – Emmanuel Ainebyoona

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PARENTS TO FEEL THE PINCH AS TERM THREE OPENS
7 september 2015
Juliet Achiro pays school fees for four children. At the beginning of the academic year, the single parent paid Shs 3.2 million for her children spread through different classes.
This term, however, Ms Achiro is expected to pay an extra Shs1 million after the schools her children go to raised fees for the third term, citing the depreciating shilling.
“It is unfair for ordinary citizens to pay for government failures to tame the dollar rise. The burden is now on us parents who struggle to pay fees. I pay fees for four children – two of them in candidate classes – and this has strained me financially. Where will I get the additional fares with this little salary?” she asked.
According to Ms Achiro, government should intervene and save the poor parents because ‘we would like to educate our children.’
The Uganda Shilling, has since the beginning of the year been sliding steadily against the major world currencies such as the US Dollar and the Euro. The Shilling has lost strength, from Shs 2,600 at the beginning of the year to Shs 3,600 despite the intervention by the Central Bank to inject more dollars in the economy in quest to tame its rise.
Against this background, private school owners under their loose association, the Uganda National Association of Private Schools, held a meeting last week aimed at finding a way to respond to the increasing cost of administration.
Among the issues agreed upon in the meeting, according to Hasbu Kilabira, the association head of research, was for the respective member schools to meet their management boards and parents and decide on the away forward.
“The dollar started rising in the second term of the year but we did not meet parents thinking it will stabilise” Mr Kilabira told Education Focus last week. “So we met as an association and decided to call for a meeting with the parents to forge a way where parents can meet the disequilibrium in feeding and stationery for the third term [officially opens today.]
But Education Minister Jessica Alupo told Education Focus that no school or association had written to the ministry requesting to increase school fees.
“We will talk when they write to us” Ms Alupo told the Education Focus during the education sector performance review last week. But the director of basic education in the education ministry, Dr Yusuf Nsubuga, told the same review workshop that government cannot stop schools from charging fees that they deem fit for their development.
“You cannot stop some people from increasing fees when they want to put developments such as a swimming [pool] and feed children on a variety of foods and yet they have parents’ support. You can control everything in Universal Secondary Education schools but you cannot stop fees increment in Non-USE and private schools” he said.
Some schools that Education Focus contacted ahead of the third term have already increased fees; others under their association are waiting for an outcome of the planned interface with parents while others have resolved to increase fees next year if the shilling continues to fall.
At Namirembe Hillside Secondary School, students paid Shs 900,000 last term but that has been revised to Shs 1.3 million, according to school head teacher Erias Mugisha.
Ms Daphine Kato, the principal Kampala Parents, said they may not increase fees now but may be necessary at the beginning of the year while Mr Godfrey Kalyango, the head teacher of Sir Apollo Kaggwa Primary School said they will maintain the Shs 800, 000 per pupil this term.
At Kabojja Junior, Mr Jamil Sendiwala, a teacher said they have maintained the Shs1.1 m. The burden now comes down to parents, who say the likely increment pushes the low income earners to the wall since employers have not responded positively to increased salaries to match the current inflation.
Other parents think government should come up with a policy refraining schools from increasing fees as it may deny a section of Ugandans to enjoy a right to education. Musa Kalyowa, a parent and an accountant said: “Government ought to formulate policies that will see our currency compete otherwise, the dollar is now affecting everyone.”
Mr Solomon Sserwadda, another expressed fear that his children, three children at Makerere College may dropout or be forced to transfer them to another school should the school fees keep raising with each term.
Shilling vs Dollar – The Shilling has lost strength, from Shs 2,600 at the beginning of the year to Shs 3,600 despite the intervention by the Central Bank to inject more dollars in the economy in quest to tame its rise.
fonte www.monitor.co.ug – Paul Tajuba

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POPE’S VISIT SET TO USHER NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR PILGRIMAGE TOURISM
7 september 2015
The upcoming Papal visit to the Central African Republic, Uganda, and Kenya in November is expected to bring tens of thousands of additional visitors to these countries, especially Uganda and Kenya, where the Catholic church is hugely influential.
Uganda is already on the map thanks to the annual Martyrs Day holiday, when the faithful from around the world flock to the shrine in Namugongo to pray. This becomes an annual milestone event supported by regional tourism boards and private sector bodies. Lesser known is the Rwandan site of worship and pilgrimage in Kibeho, where the apparition of Mary, mother of Jesus, appeared in 1981 and 1982. The site became a tourist attraction about 2 years ago but remains little known to Catholic pilgrims around the world.
However, as a meeting of tourism gurus at the Kigali Serena Hotel this morning concluded, the Papal visit has the potential to change this state of affairs. Carmen Nibigira, coordinator of the East Africa Tourism Platform, was joined by the West African tourism guru Ukechi Uko; Serena’s country manager, Charles Muia; Serena’s Director of Marketing, Rosemary Mugambi; Sandra Idossou of The ServiceMag; and others to discuss a closer East African cooperation aimed to increase the number of visitors from Nigeria and other West African countries with a large Catholic population.
Air connections are now readily available for instance, via RwandAir from Lagos, Accra, Douala, Libreville, and Brazzaville to Kigali and from there on to Uganda, which allows pilgrims to combine visits to two sites during one trip. The common tourist visa under the Northern Corridor Integration Project countries is a further benefit when visitors come to Eastern Africa and intend to visit both Uganda and Rwanda.
The visit to Uganda and Rwanda may also include additional activities, such as partaking in a safari, playing golf at the Lake Victoria Serena Golf Course, or exploring Lake Kivu by boat from Lake Kivu Serena Hotel.
Most importantly, it was agreed to use Ukechi Uko’s tourism trade contacts in Nigeria and across West Africa to get the message out about the Pope’s visit to Uganda as well as the two pilgrimage sites and the upcoming AKWAABA African Travel Market in Lagos from November 22-24. This will offer a perfect opportunity to promote such packages just days before Pope Francis visits Uganda from November 27-29.
Further details on AKWAABA will go out later this week; a special Wedding Show will be held on November 22, where information on airlines connecting East and West Africa and wedding packages to the Kenyan coast, the shores of Lake Victoria or the shores of Lake Kivu will be readily available.
Stakeholders were equally enthusiastic about the opportunities arising from the Papal visit to Uganda. They expressed their hope for the boost of regional pilgrimage sites of Namugongo and Kibeho, as well as the anticipated rise in visitor numbers throughout the entire year. Tourism cooperation in East Africa is being brought into action.
fonte www.newsnow.co.uk – Prof. Wolfgang H. Thome

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UPTAKE OF EAST AFRICA’S SINGLE TOURIST VISA INCREASES
8 september 2015
Since East Africa’s single tourist visa was launched in February last year, 4,000 visas have been issued. This is a month-on-month improvement from an average of 156 visas sold in the 10 months to December last year, to 305 this year. With the visa, foreigners can visit attractions in Kenya, Uganda and Rwanda on paying a fee of $100 (Sh 10,600); Tanzania and Burundi are not party to the deal.
Speaking last week at a networking session for regional tour operators held in Rwanda, Yamina Karitanyi, chief tourism officer, Rwanda Development Board, said this illustrates that easing the visa process can significantly increase the uptake of the region’s tourism products.
“Kenya and Uganda had to revise their visa fees in favour of the harmonised visa charges. It takes political will for that to happen and it’s good that our three leaders are committed to the process” she said.
Carmen Nibigira, the regional co-ordinator for the East Africa Tourism Platform, added: “We tour over a dozen countries in Europe using the Schengen visa. There is no reason East Africa should have restrictions when visiting all five countries.”
Kenya Association of Hotel Owners and Caterers CEO Mike Macharia called on regional airlines to lower fares to enable more passengers take advantage of the new visa regime.
fonte www.newsnow.co.uk Peter Muiruri

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ONU: MORTALITÀ BIMBI DIMEZZATA IN 25 ANNI, OBIETTIVO ERA 75%
9 settembre 2015
La mortalità infantile nel mondo si è più che dimezzata (-53%) negli ultimi 25 anni anche se l’obiettivo (uno dei Millennium Development Goals fissati dall’Onu nel 2000) era di ridurla del 75%. I bambini sotto i 5 anni morti sono passati da 91 su 1000 nati nel 1990 a 43 su 1000 nel 2015 secondo i dati pubblicati dalla rivista media Lancet sulla base di studi condotti dalle agenzie dell’Onu, Unicef e Organizzazione Mondiale della Sanità (Oms).
Tradotte le percentuali in cifre più brutali si è passati da 12,7 milioni di bambini morti nel 1990, la maggior parte per cause prevedibili, ai 5,9 milioni di quest’anno. L’Onu intende rilanciare puntando ad un tasso di mortalità infantile di 25 bambini su 1.000 da qui al 2030. Obiettivo, ‘Sustainable Development Goals’ (Sdg), che sarà approvato a fine mese dall’Assemblea Generale.
Metà dei bambini sono deceduti per malnutrizione e il 45% durante i loro primi 28 giorni di vita. Le altre cause di decesso precoce sono complicazioni legate al parto, nascite premature, polmonite, diarrea, setticemia e malaria. I Paesi dove i piccoli sotto i 5 anni muoiono di più sono quelli dell’Africa occidentale. Dati positivi, invece, emergono da due macro-aree: l’Asia orientale ed il Pacifico, insieme con l’America e i Caraibi. Qui 62 nazioni hanno centrato l’obiettivo della riduzione del tasso di mortalità incluse Etiopia, Eritrea, Bangladesh, Georgia, El Salvador, Bolivia, Egitto, Cambogia, Nepal e Yemen.
In ogni caso i dati sono incoraggianti perché il declino della mortalità infantile è accelerato tra il 2000 ed il 2015 rispetto al decennio 1990-2000: in 102 Paesi sono morti nell’ultimo 15ennio 18 milioni di bambini in meno, comunque un’enormità, ma il trend è al ribasso. Se si mantenesse costante il tasso di mortalità 94 milioni di bambini moriranno prima di compiere un anno nei prossimi 15 anni. Ma se si continua a migliorare il numero scenderà a 69 milioni, per ‘crollare’ a 56 milioni se sarà – promettono al Palazzo di Vetro – rispettato il nuovo obiettivo del Sustainable Development Goals.
fonte www.repubblica.it

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KENYA, UGANDA E CENTRAFRICA: A NOVEMBRE IL VIAGGIO DI PAPA FRANCESCO
10 settembre 2015
Dopo le visite al Sudamerica e all’Asia, quelle in Europa e in Medio Oriente e alla vigilia dell’atteso viaggio a Cuba e negli Stati Uniti, Papa Francesco si prepara già a raggiungere un altro angolo del mondo, quello problematico dell’Africa profonda.
Padre Federico Lombardi, direttore della sala stampa della Santa Sede, ha reso noto che accogliendo l’invito dei rispettivi capi di Stato e dei vescovi, Bergoglio compirà un viaggio apostolico in Kenya dal 25 al 27 novembre 2015, in Uganda dal 27 al 29 novembre e nella Repubblica Centrafricana dal 29 al 30 novembre. Il programma dettagliato del viaggio sarà pubblicato prossimamente.
Era stato lo stesso Papa Francesco, lo scorso giugno, rispondendo a un sacerdote africano durante un incontro a San Giovanni in Laterano, ad annunciare che in novembre sarebbe andato in Africa.
Nei tre Paesi che saranno raggiunti dal pontefice i cristiani, non solo cattolici, sono una porzione consistente: circa il 50% nella Repubblica Centrafricana e circa l’85% per cento in Uganda. Meno numerosi (35%) in Kenya dove però lo scorso aprile c’è stata la strage contro gli studenti cristiani del collegio di Garissa, che ha causato centinaia di morti.
Anche la Repubblica centrafricana vive, dalla fine del 2013, una situazione di violenze interne, in alcuni casi di matrice religiosa, e, se saranno confermate le anticipazioni delle scorse settimane, Papa Francesco visiterà la ‘moschea del Km 5′ che due anni fa devastata nel corso dei sanguinosi scontri fra le milizie ‘cristiane’ degli anti-Balaka e i ribelli islamici dei Seleka.
Il dialogo con le altre religioni per la pace, dunque, certo non mancherà tra i temi e gli obiettivi del primo viaggio africano di Papa Francesco. L’Africa è il quarto continente raggiunto dal pontefice argentino eletto dal conclave trenta mesi fa.
Ma nell’agenda vaticana ci sono già altre mete cerchiate in rosso. A luglio 2016, ad esempio, è certo che il Papa sarà in Polonia, a Cracovia, per la Giornata mondiale della gioventù mentre in occasione del viaggio compiuto all’Europarlamento di Strasburgo nel novembre scorso, è stata resa nota la volontà di Bergoglio di compiere una visita alla Francia con tappa a Parigi.
È stato direttamente Papa Francesco, nella conferenza stampa durante il volo di ritorno dalle Filippine, ad anticipare che l’atteso viaggio nella sua Argentina dovrebbe pure avvenire nel 2016, quando l’aereo papale potrebbe arrivare anche in Cile e Uruguay.
fonte www.repubblica.it

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MALARIA DEATHS ‘FALL 60% SINCE 2000′
17 september 2015
Malaria deaths worldwide have fallen by 60 percent since 2000, the UN said Thursday, with improved diagnostic tests and the massive distribution of mosquito nets aiding dramatic progress against the disease.
Fifteen years ago, an estimated 262 million malaria cases killed nearly 840,000 people.
Projections for 2015 indicate that some 214 million cases are likely to cause 438,000 deaths, according to a joint report from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations children’s agency (UNICEF).
“Global malaria control is one of the great public health success stories of the past 15 years” WHO Director-General Margaret Chan said. Had malaria infection and death rates remained unchanged since 2000, another 6.2 million people would have died, according to the report.
“We can beat this ancient killer” she added in a statement, while noting that children under five still make up the overwhelming majority of malaria victims. Most of the gains were recorded in Asia and the Caucasus, but in Africa the picture was less encouraging.
Sub-Saharan nations accounted for nearly 80 percent of global malaria deaths this year and efforts to curb infection rates in the region lagged substantially behind other parts of the world.
Chan and UNICEF executive director Anthony Lake warned that because of this ‘uneven’ progress, more attention and resources had to be paid to the hardest hit nations.
“Eliminating malaria on a global scale is possible but only if we overcome these barriers and accelerate progress” Lake and Chan said in a joint release.
A billion nets, better diagnosis – Highlighting the steps that helped curb infection rates, the report said that about one billion insecticide-treated nets had been distributed in Africa since 2000.
At the start of the millennium, less than two percent of children under five were sleeping under the specialized nets, a figure that has risen to 68 percent over the last 15 years.
With mosquitoes largely circulating at night, the report indicated that this mass distribution of nets in high malaria areas had helped significantly bring down infections, especially among children. Nets have also gotten better, the report said, citing new technology developed since 2000 that eliminated the need for insecticide to be re-applied every few years.
A persistent problem, especially in Africa, has been a tendency among patients and medical workers to treat all fever-like symptoms as malaria, which has hurt the supply of treatment available to those who actually have the disease.
But the introduction of new testing kits that give fast and accurate results has helped medical workers in the developing world distinguish between malarial and non-malarial fevers more quickly “enabling more timely and appropriate treatment” the report said.
Increased urbanization worldwide had also helped as people living in cities are often closer to health services. Funding for malaria has increased 20-fold since 2000, UNICEF and WHO said, but they noted that more resources were needed to step up the fight against the disease.
The two UN agencies set a target to reduce infections by another 90 percent by 2030. “We know how to prevent and treat malaria” UNICEF’s Lake said. “Since we can do it, we must.”
fonte www.newvision.co.ug 

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LOTTA ALLA MALARIA: DUE STUDI CONFERMANO PROGRESSI
17 settembre 2015
Quasi 700 milioni di casi di contagio sono stati scongiurati in Africa negli ultimi 15 anni grazie agli sforzi e alla cooperazione internazionali tesi a contrastare la diffusione della malaria: lo indica uno studio pubblicato oggi dalla rivista ‘Nature’, avvalorato dai progressi certificati dall’Organizzazione mondiale della sanità (Oms).
Secondo la ricerca, realizzata da esperti dell’Università di Oxford sulla base di dati raccolti in 30.000 centri dell’area sub-sahariana, dal 2000 il numero dei casi è diminuito di oltre il 50%. Progressi decisivi sono stati ottenuti grazie alla diffusione di zanzariere con insetticida, farmaci a base di artemisia e uso di spray specifici.
L’analisi di ‘Nature’ trova riscontro in uno studio dell’Oms, secondo il quale dal 2000 a livello mondiale il numero dei contagi si è ridotto del 37%, mentre la mortalità addirittura del 60%. Continuano a pesare, però, squilibri significativi a livello regionale. Secondo l’Oms, nell’area sub-sahariana si concentrano infatti l’80% dei casi e il 78% dei decessi. Un motivo in più, sottolinea l’organizzazione, per tenere alta la guardia e intensificare gli sforzi.
Nel maggio scorso, in occasione dell’assemblea generale dell’Oms, è stato fissato il traguardo di ridurre ulteriormente del 40% il numero dei casi entro il 2020 e del 90% entro il 2030.
fonte www.misna.org

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UGANDAN ECONOMY TO GROW BY UP TO 5.5 PERCENT
19 september 2015
Uganda’s economy continues to perform below par thanks to persistent high lending rates, weak export performance and infrastructure gaps – rendering its seven per cent growth target elusive since 2012.
Lending rates have averaged more than 20 per cent over the past three years, amid high costs of funding experienced by banks, observers say.
Whereas Uganda’s economy grew by five per cent against a target of 5.8 per cent during 2014/15, down from 5.7 per cent against a target of 6.2 per cent in 2013/14, Bank of Uganda (BoU) data shows.
The World Bank now projects growth between five and 5.5 per cent during 2015/16 in light of depressed investment flows attributed to uncertainty over election campaigns.
“A noticeable slowdown in investments may be felt during the pre-election period as investors stay away… Continued suspense surrounding the US Fed’s intentions of raising interest rates will force BoU to adopt a ‘wait and see’ attitude before intervening in the forex market as a result of depleted stabilisation resources” said Rachael Kaggwa Sebudde, lead economist at the World Bank Uganda country office.
A large current account deficit caused by surging imports pegged to large infrastructure projects and depressed exports is expected to put further pressure on the shilling, observers say.
The country’s current account deficit increased from 7.9 per cent of gross domestic product in 2013/14 to 8.8 per cent of GDP in 2014/15 while total export revenues fell by 2.8 per cent to $680 million at the end of June. The Ugandan shilling lost 24 per cent against the greenback during 2014/15, according to World Bank data – a trend that saw the former hit Ush3,300 in June amid increased capital flight caused by investor worries over economic stability prior to next year’s general election.
A weaker shilling directly translates into higher import expenses incurred by government and private enterprises and increased core inflation – an official gauge of price changes in foreign sourced goods and services.
Rising interest rates triggered by steep increases in the Central Bank Rate (CBR) witnessed since June have raised risks of ‘crowding out’ for the private sector and increased interest payments incurred by government on domestic debt; a trend that could translate into muted economic growth.
fonte www.allafrica.com – Bernard Busuulwa

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PRESIDENZIALI, MUSEVENI SI CANDIDA ANCORA
21 settembre 2015
Il presidente Yoweri Museveni, già al potere da quasi 30 anni, si candiderà nel 2016 per un nuovo mandato: la decisione è divenuta ufficiale dopo un congresso del suo partito National Resistance Movement (Nrm). Alla guida dell’Uganda dal 1986, Museveni ha già vinto quattro elezioni presidenziali.
A sfidarlo il prossimo anno sarà ancora una volta Kizza Besigye, dirigente del Forum for Democratic Change. Per la prima volta a rappresentare l’opposizione sarà invece Amama Mbabazi, già primo ministro, entrato in rotta di collisione con Museveni lo scorso anno.
fonte www.misna.org

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MEDICS EXCITED BY REVOLUTIONARY NEWBORN TREATMENT
23 september 2015
60 clinicians and newborn care providers from across Africa Wednesday convened at Kiwoko hospital in Nakaseke district to deliberate and share experiences on the usage of the revolutionary treatment procedure called continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP).
The continuous positive airway procedure also refered to as the Kiwoko positive air pressure (KPAP) is a form of treatment that uses continuous mild air pressure to keep an infant’s airway open, thereby helping them to breath.
According to Dr Maneesh Batra of the Seattle Children’s hospital in the United States, the continuous positive airway pressure procedure can also be used to treat pre-term infants whose lungs have not fully developed and who are suffering from respiratory distress syndrome or bronchopulmonary dysplasia.
Respiratory distress syndrome is according to the World Health Organisation a leading cause of neonatal deaths in low income and middle income countries.
Complications from respiratory distress syndrome are responsible for deaths of approximately 1 million babies per year. Respiratory distress syndrome is also associated with a high rate of morbidity.
The KPAP treatment procedure going by accounts has led to a remarkable reduction in Kiwoko hospital’s infant mortality rates. 50% of babies born before 32 weeks of gestational age at Kiwoko have survived respiratory distress syndrome as a result of the treatment in the past few years.
In 2013 and 2014, Kiwoko hospital in partnership with Adara, an international development organisation focused on perfecting KPAP delivery with air and oxygen blending as oxygen only (KPAP) can leave babies with damage to their retinas.
Dr James Nyonyintono, the deputy medical director at Kiwoko hospital, says plans are in high gear to design a new low cost bubble continuous positive airway pressure kit that will not require assembly at power source or a source of compressed air.
“Our team comprised of medical people from Uganda and the United states devised improvised bubble continuous positive airway pressure devices using tubes, connectors, nasal prongs and a water bottle as the bubbler. These devices provide lifesaving respiratory support to pre-term infants. These devices generally rely on a 100% source of oxygen” Nyonyintono says.
This device, Nyonyintono adds targets babies who struggle to breath at birth.
“The continuous positive airway pressure procedure works well if you can deliver pressure to the lungs of the baby. New solid and cheap devices are going to be incorporated onto what we are already using like for example the oxygen blenders. The oxygen blender developed by (PATH) one of our partners entrains room air into the flowing oxygen in order to provide a safer gas for infants to breath using the bubble continuous positive airway pressure devices” Nyonyintono adds.
The workshop organised under the theme ‘Expanding the reach of bubble CPAP devices’ was co-hosted by Kiwoko Hospital, the Adara Group and PATH, an international nonprofit organisation.
It was funded through the Saving Lives at Birth partners, including the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the Government of Norway, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Grand Challenges Canada, and the UK Government.
fonte www.newvision.co.ug

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ACCORDO INTERNAZIONALE PER IL PARCO DEL VIRUNGA
24 settembre 2015
I rappresentanti di Repubblica democratica del Congo, Uganda e Rwanda hanno formato a Kinshasa un accordo transfrontaliero per tutelare la flora e la fauna dell’area del Virunga e incoraggiare il turismo nella regione.
“Lo abbiamo concepito – ha detto a proposito del nuovo trattato Elvis Mutiri Wa Bashara, ministro congolese del Turismo – nell’ottica di sviluppare l’ecoturismo, che è un tassello importante di questo settore per la repubblica Democratica del Congo e i paesi vicini”. In questo quadro, sarà tra l’altro organizzato ad ottobre prossimo un censimento dei gorilla di montagna che abitano l’area e per i quali il parco nazionale congolese del Virunga è celebre.
Il parco nazionale congolese del Virunga, esteso su 790.000 ettari, comprende un’enorme varietà di habitat, dalla savana all’alta montagna, che lo rendono unico tra i parchi africani, secondo l’Unesco. Anche quest’area, tuttavia, non è passata indenne attraverso il conflitto ultraventennale che attraversa la regione e di recente è tornata al centro dell’attenzione per il rischio che vi fossero iniziate controverse prospezioni petrolifere.
fonte www.misna.org

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ONE IN EVERY THREE PEOPLE IS MALNOURISHED
26 september 2015
Uganda is on course in tackling malnutrition among children, a new global report says.
It particularly lists Uganda among the top 32 countries worldwide whose mothers appreciate exclusive breastfeeding of their babies. Exclusive breastfeeding means that an infant receives only breast milk in the first six months.
However, the country is yet to achieve all the nutritional targets which were endorsed at the 2012 World Health Assembly. The targets, which are supposed to 2015 are removal stunting (low height for age), wasting (low weight for height), overweight among children under five, exclusive breastfeeding, and anemia in women of reproductive age.
Only Kenya is on course for all five targets. Colombia, Ghana, Vanuatu and Viet Nam have achieved only four targets. Uganda is in the third pool of promising countries along with Algeria, Benin, Bolivia, Burundi, El Salvador, Georgia, Jordan , Liberia, Republic of Moldova, Swaziland and Zimbabwe. Pakistan is among the 20 countries that have met only one target.
The Global Nutrition Report aims at building greater commitment to improved nutrition in all countries.
The report states that one in three members of the global population is malnourished, yet the strategies or high-impact interventions available to resolve it are not being implemented due to lack of money, skills or political pressure.
“When one in three of us are held back, we as families, communities and nations cannot move forward” said Lawrence Haddad, lead author of the study and senior research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute.
“This not only jeopardizes the lives of those who are malnourished, but also affects the larger framework for economic growth and sustainable development. Simply put: people cannot get anywhere near their full potential without first overcoming malnutrition.”
Globally, more than 160 million children worldwide under five are too short for their age or stunted, while more than 50 million do not weigh enough for their height. The report shows that the prevalence of obesity rose in every single country between 2010 and 2014, and one in 12 adults worldwide now has Type 2 diabetes.
In Uganda, 33% percent of children under five are stunted or short for their age and 14 percent are severely stunted, according to the 2011 demographic health survey by the Uganda Bureau of Statistics. 5% of children under five are wasted (low weight for height) and 2 percent are severely wasted.
Fourteen percent of children under five are underweight and 3 percent are severely underweight.
Nutrition experts say there is need to sensitize mothers on the right foods to give children, saying is not checked, the results can be daunting.
“Poor nutrition affects the mental development of a child especially those aged less than 5 years. The child will be falling sick recurrently, because the immunity is weak” says Jamiru Mpiima, a nutritionist at Victoria University Healthcare Center.
Mpiima, who is also a dietician at Hoima Hospital, explains stunting if often a result of lack of feeding over an extended period. This may be in areas where there is chronic poverty and long spells of drought or rainfall.
The report also agrees that climate change is complicating global efforts to end malnutrition. “Even small and seasonal fluctuations in climate can have big impacts on food availability and disease patterns, and these in turn dramatically affect children’s survival and development” it says.
Mpiima also urges urban mothers to not just stop at breastfeeding but also include fruits, vegetables on the menu. The health state minister in charge of general duties, Dr. Chris Baryomunsi says the ministry is calling up maternal and child health programmes in Uganda. “And nutrition is one of the components within these programmes.”
fonte www.newvision.co.ug

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UgandAbout è un servizio di Italia Uganda Onlus a cura di Simona Meneghelli.

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